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    The Story of James Jauncey, a Merchant and Loyalist in the New York General Assembly Written from the First-person Perspective

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    My name is Mister James Jauncey, a proud loyalist and merchant who immigrated from Barbados to New York with my brother, John Jauncey. We became very successful merchants, dealing in dry goods between. The Caribbean and New York; my position of power in the trading industry led me into. The smuggling business during the Seven Years War. I smuggled various types of goods- mostly dry goods and iron products- from colonies of other European nations.

    For example, I traded logwood from Spanish colonies to Amsterdam without paying any taxes. While this was a common practice in merchants of the West Indies. This was a direct violation of of the Navigation Acts- a contradicting feature to my steadfast loyalty to the British throne.

    As my smuggling trade grew, my power in maritime trade grew with my establishment in New York. I became a warden of the port in New York, helping me further my smuggling career by allowing me to learn the port, the loopholes, and who to bribe in the name of importing products. My ambition led me to be a founder of the Chamber of Commerce in New York, a leading member of the Wall Street Presbyterian Church, and I was elected into the Provincial Assembly alongside my fellow Loyalists in this game.

    As a loyalist, I have a plethora of political victories that I must accomplish prior to the end of the game. By the end of the first session, I must nominate a member of my faction to be Speaker of the Provincial Congress. If I cannot get a Loyalist to be the Speaker, I must make sure that a Moderate is elected. While I could nominate myself as the Speaker of the Provincial Congress, I have a lot of enemies during my time in the Assembly, and I could be targeted while being in a position of power.

    I, along with the two other Loyalists James Delancey and Frederick Philipse, must threaten the credibility of the Association proposal in votes of the Provincial Congress, mainly accomplished during the first game session. With the help of my faction, Loyalists must reopen the New York City courts. I am to limit military preparedness as much as possible, only supporting militia training and avoiding New Yorkers being shipped off of the colonies for military purposes. Loyalists, being loyal to the crown and the British government, must convince those in the New York society to reconcile with the British Empire and oppose all ideas of independence.

    As for personal objectives, I must maintain deference from the New York society. I demand to be only referred to be call “Mister James Jauncey” or “Squire” by members of the Provincial Congress and the Crowd. I call my fellow Loyalists by the surname “Lord” or “Sir” and, by the consensus of being a man worthy of the title, Robert Livingston-leader of the Patriot Party. I wear a powdered wig and white button down shirts, showing my wealth and power to have such luxuries as clean clothes and a periwig.

    The underlying goal of this victory is to preserve respect from my society. The most consistent victory that carries on throughout the game sessions is my deceit of smuggling tea. As a greedy, power hungry man, I am constantly looking for a way to gain personal wealth. Boycotting of British products allow an opportunity for desperate colonists to obtain their beloved tea as I receive more money in my gluttonous desires.

    From the viewpoint of a Loyalist, my main relationships are going to be among my faction. We all believe in the ideals of “loyalty to country, protection of property, and obedience to law,” (Role Sheet, 8) but differ slightly in our ambitions and current status of persuasion. For example, James Delancey is the leader of our faction and a wealthy man who has been the head of New York politics for generations. His mighty political hand and expendable money have the power to wield to any will, proving to be a beneficial asset to someone trying to gain an upperhand in society.

    As a smuggler, I tend to make deals on both sides while holding a certain character around people that could potentially destroy my name. With this thinking, an important relationship would be the main leader of my enemies: Robert Livingston. If I were to create an amiable or even empathetic relationship with him, I would hold power with both leaders of the two major political parties for political or personal gain.

    As a Loyalist with those previously stated objectives in mind, my texts and sources used for my speeches will be from men such as John Locke, Samuel Seabury, and Samuel Johnson. For the first of my two speeches I address to the assembly of men, women, and slaves is on the subject of protecting the rights to private property. In Samuel Johnson’s Taxation No Tyranny, Johnson speaks of the root purpose of the Coercive Acts.

    “When it is said, that the whole town of Boston is distressed for a misdemeanor of a few, we wonder at their shamelessness; for we know that the town of Boston and all the associated provinces, are now in rebellion to defend or justify the criminals’… “To what is urged of new powers granted to the courts of admiralty, or the extension of authority conferred on the judges, it may be answered, in a few words, that they themselves made such regulations necessary; that they are established for the prevention of greater evils.” (Taxation No Tyranny, Section 7).

    With texts from Johnson, I need to focus on discrediting the Association by attacking its legitimacy and wisdom through the texts of Samuel Seabury’s Free Thoughts on the Proceedings of the Continental Congress in a Letter to the Farmer. “…clamors, discord, confusion, mobs, riots, insurrections, rebellions, in Great-Britain, Ireland, and the West-Indies.

    This consequence does not indeed immediately affect You, the Farmers of New-York; nor do I think it a probable one: But the Congress certainly intended it should happen to some degree, or the effect they propose from these agreements cannot possibly take place. They intend to distress the manufacturers in Great-Britain, by depriving them of employment- to distress the inhabitants of Ireland, by depriving them of flax-seed, and of a vent for their linens” (Free Thoughts, Section 1)

    In my second and final speech to the New York society, I will refer to John Locke’s Second Treatise of Government to explain the importance of the British rule over the colonist through the concept of the law of Nature. “I doubt not bit it will be objected that it is unreasonable for men to be judges in their own cases, that self-love will make men partial to themselves and their friends; and on the other side, ill-nature, passion, and revenge will carry them too far in punishing others, and hence nothing but confusion and disorder will follow, and that therefore God has certainly appointed government to restrain the partiality and violence of men.” (Second Treatise of Government, Chapter II, Section 13)

    Being a part of the Loyalist Party, my main enemy is the Patriot Party. I believe that those in positions of power in the Patriot Party are “[consisting] primarily of men of mean stature, nouveau riche, cleaned-pirates, and work-apron artisans who have no family name or connections.” (Role Sheet, 2) I believe that the British Empire holds true to the ideals of virtue, loyalty, and protection of private property- those that speak against the British government, in my eyes, are against those very concepts that they claim to fight for.

    While upholding a proud Loyalist facade, I am still playing the role of a deceitful smuggler. Therefore, my other enemy is the whole of New York society (Loyalists, Patriots, and the Crowd); I am constantly in danger of being caught while smuggling tea, and in turn see everyone as a possible enemy between me and my profit.

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    The Story of James Jauncey, a Merchant and Loyalist in the New York General Assembly Written from the First-person Perspective. (2022, Dec 10). Retrieved from https://artscolumbia.org/the-story-of-james-jauncey-a-merchant-and-loyalist-in-the-new-york-general-assembly-written-from-the-first-person-perspective/

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