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Life in the renaissance

Queen Elizabeth most likely used different rhetorical appeals in her Address to the Troops at Tilbury and her Response to Parliament’s Request That She Marry due to differences in

wealth and upbringing.
age and education.
audience and purpose.
location and gender.

c.
Read the excerpt from Queen Elizabeth’s Response to Parliament’s Request That She Marry.

The realm shall not remain destitute of any heir that may be a fit governour, and peradventure more beneficial to the realm, than such offspring as may come of me: For though I be never so careful of your well-doing, and mind ever so to be, yet may my issue grow out of kind, and become perhaps ungracious.

What is Queen Elizabeth’s purpose in this excerpt?

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to persuade Parliament that the method of choosing successors to the throne based simply on birthright needs to be revised
to persuade Parliament that her child should not be considered a possible choice for successor to the English throne
to persuade Parliament that simply because she has a child does not guarantee that the child will be a competent ruler
to persuade Parliament how catastrophic it could be if they acted ungraciously toward her or her child

b.
In Queen Elizabeth’s Address to the Troops at Tilbury, phrases such as “my faithful and loving people,” “the loyal hearts and good will of my subjects,” and “you have deserved rewards and crowns” are examples of a rhetorical appeal to

pathos because she is encouraging the troops by explaining exactly why she has faith in them.
pathos because she is encouraging the troops by attempting to elicit their feelings of loyalty.
logos because she is encouraging the troops by reminding them of rewards they will receive.
logos because she is encouraging the troops by listing the reasons England is relying on them.

b.
Read the excerpt from Queen Elizabeth’s Response to Parliament’s Request That She Marry.

For I assure you (what credit my assurance may have with you, I cannot tell, but what credit it shall deserve to have, the sequel shall declare) I will never in that matter conclude any thing that shall be prejudicial to the realm. For the weal, good and safety whereof, I will never shun to spend my life; and whomsoever it shall be my chance to light upon, I trust he shall be such, as shall be as careful for the realm as you; I will not say as myself, because I cannot so certainly determine of any other, but by my desire he shall be such as shall be as careful for the preservation of the realm and you, as myself.

In this excerpt, Queen Elizabeth says “for the weal, good and safety whereof, I will never shun to spend my life” in order to

convince her audience that she is unbiased, intelligent, and rarely makes mistakes.
inform her audience that she will work hard to win back the broken trust of her followers.
persuade her audience that she will never make personal decisions that will harm England.
remind her audience that she is the ruler and in charge of enacting laws that protect England.

c.
The primary purpose of both Queen Elizabeth’s Address to the Troops at Tilbury and Response to Parliament’s Request That She Marry is to

entertain.
persuade.
inform.
criticize.

b.
Read the excerpt from Queen Elizabeth’s Address to the Troops at Tilbury.

Let tyrants fear, I have always so behaved myself, that, under God, I have placed my chiefest strength and safeguard in the loyal hearts and good will of my subjects, and therefore I am come amongst you, as you see, at this time, not for my recreation and disport, but being resolved in the midst and heat of the battle, to live or die among you all, to lay down for my God, and for my kingdoms, and for my people, my honour, and my blood, even in the dust.

Which statement best describes Queen Elizabeth’s use of rhetorical appeals in this excerpt?

She relies on ethos by explaining that she has previous experience fighting in battles.
She relies on pathos by providing examples of other successes she has had as a ruler.
She relies on ethos by establishing that she is there for more than just recreation.
She relies on pathos by using emotionally charged words to motivate the troops.

d.
Read the excerpt from Queen Elizabeth’s Response to Parliament’s Request That She Marry.

The realm shall not remain destitute of any heir that may be a fit governour, and peradventure more beneficial to the realm, than such offspring as may come of me: For though I be never so careful of your well-doing, and mind ever so to be, yet may my issue grow out of kind, and become perhaps ungracious.

Which statement best describes Queen Elizabeth’s use of rhetorical appeals in this excerpt?

She relies on logos by listing for Parliament some of her personal reasons for wanting to remain unmarried and childless.
She relies on pathos by attempting to make the members of Parliament feel sorry for her and the fact that she is unmarried and childless.
She relies on logos by providing reasons why Parliament should not worry about the fact that she is unmarried and childless.
She relies on pathos by making the members of Parliament feel foolish for worrying about the fact that she is unmarried and childless.

c.
Read the excerpts from Queen Elizabeth’s speeches.

In excerpts from both Address to the Troops at Tilbury and Response to Parliament’s Request That She Marry, Queen Elizabeth uses a rhetorical appeal to

pathos by encouraging her audience to feel emotions including pride.
logos by reminding her audience that they will be rewarded for their work.
pathos by making her audience feel ashamed for doubting her capabilities.
logos by providing her audience with a list of the reasons why she is grateful.

a.
Read the excerpt from Queen Elizabeth’s Address to the Troops at Tilbury.

I know I have the body but of a weak and feeble woman; but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too, and think foul scorn that Parma or Spain, or any prince of Europe, should dare to invade the borders of my realm; to which, rather than any dishonour shall grow by me, I myself will take up arms, I myself will be your general, judge, and rewarder of every one of your virtues in the field.

In this excerpt, Queen Elizabeth is attempting to persuade troops that she

dislikes most European countries.
has the qualities of a capable leader.
is physically able to fight as a soldier.
will make a fair and virtuous judge.

b.
Which excerpts from Queen Elizabeth’s Address to the Troops at Tilbury rely on a rhetorical appeal to ethos to persuade soldiers that she is a capable commander? Check all that apply.

I do not desire to live to distrust.
I have the body but of a weak and feeble woman.
I have the heart and stomach of a king.
I myself will be your general, judge, and rewarder.
I am come amongst you, as you see, at this time.

3,4
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

The purpose of fasting on Wednesdays is specifically to encourage the eating of fish, to support the fishing industry. People therefore respond differently. Some households uphold the old religious fasts during Advent and Lent, as if they are still observing the religious law; others ignore Advent but observe the Lenten fast. Still others ignore Wednesdays and just fast on Fridays and Saturdays.

Why does the author use third-person point of view in this excerpt?

The author wants to present factual information effectively.
The author wants to draw the reader deeper into the experience.
The author wants to directly address the audience.
The author wants to persuade the reader of his idea.

a.
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

But be careful if you adopt a partial regime: heavy fines are levied for eating meat on nonmeat days. The standard fine is £3 or three months imprisonment, but in 1561 a London butcher slaughtering three oxen in Lent is fined £20. Fines can be levied on the head of a household for every single member who breaks the fast, so if you have lots of servants, make sure they all obey the law.

What is the effect of the second-person point of view in this excerpt?

It allows the reader to personally experience the effects of hunger during Elizabethan England.
It puts the reader in the place of the Elizabethan who has to pay fines for eating meat.
It explains to the reader which types of food were acceptable during Lent.
It describes the difficulties of being the head of an Elizabethan household.

b.
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

If you are hungry, you might feel inclined to turn to poaching. But be careful: this is risky. Taking livestock is theft, and theft is a felony which carries the death sentence. Killing wild animals that live on another man’s land is also against the law; even taking a single fish from a river can result in a fine of a shilling or more. It is unlikely that you will be hanged for taking a wild animal such as a rabbit; but, even so, you will get a fine amounting to three times the value of the animal as well as three months in prison, and you will have to enter into a bond to guarantee your good behavior in the future; a second offense will be treated more harshly. If a gamekeeper attacks you and you defend yourself, you can be charged with assault. You may find yourself on the gallows if you injure him.

What is the author’s purpose in this excerpt?

to explain why many Elizabethans tried poaching
to explain why poaching was dangerous
to explain why landowners punished poachers
to explain why poaching often was forgiven

b.
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

For the vast majority of yeomen in the country, it is vitally important to store hard fruit through the whole year. To do this, select faultless apples and pears without a bruise or other mark, and leave a length of stalk on them. Place them carefully in your fruit house or “hoard house” on clean dry straw, make sure they are not touching each other, and turn them very carefully every month to avoid their collecting moisture. And, most important, keep the door to the fruit house shut, “lest children make havoc there.”

Which detail from the text best supports the inference that one bad apple can spoil all the others?

. . . it is vitally important to store hard fruit through the whole year.
Place them carefully in your fruit house or “hoard house” on clean dry straw . . .
. . . make sure they are not touching each other . . .
. . . turn them very carefully every month to avoid their collecting moisture.

c.
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

Pig farmers keep their flitches of bacon back in storage until they can get a better price for them later in the winter. Such tactics are made even more profitable by the unhappy fact that harvests can fail, causing local—and sometimes national—food shortages. Large towns are less vulnerable, being part of an international market that sees preserved foods traded long-distance; but much of the countryside is dependent on fresh food. After a poor harvest, prices for all commodities—not just grain—rise dramatically and the poor are unable to make ends meet.

Which detail from the excerpt best supports the inference that food was more consistently available in larger towns?

Pig farmers keep their flitches of bacon back in storage until they can get a better price for them later in the winter.
Such tactics are made even more profitable by the unhappy fact that harvests can fail, causing local—and sometimes national—food shortages.
Large towns are less vulnerable, being part of an international market that sees preserved foods traded long-distance; but much of the countryside is dependent on fresh food.
After a poor harvest, prices for all commodities—not just grain—rise dramatically and the poor are unable to make ends meet.

c.
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

Food is valuable in Elizabethan England, far more so than in the modern world. A flock of 180 sheep is worth more than the average detached house. The difficulties of transportation mean that the food supply depends heavily on what grows locally and how much surplus is available. It also depends on the season. Harvest is obviously a time of much grain and fruit.

Which ideas are implicitly stated in the excerpt? Check all that apply.

Food was more valuable in Elizabethan times than it is today.
Detached houses are cheaper than large flocks of sheep.
Difficulty in food transportation limited food availability.
Not many Elizabethans ate exotic fruit.
Food was more scarce during the winter months.
More people had food during harvest season.

4,5,6
Which of these excerpts from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England is related from the second-person point of view?

Hills might feature in an Elizabethan writer’s description of a county because of their potential for sheep grazing . . .
Those things that Elizabethans take for granted are precisely what you will find most striking . . .
Before this, they do not need such a word, for they do not see a “landscape” as such . . .
Shakespeare does not use the word “landscape” at all; he uses the word “country” . . .

b.
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

Food is valuable in Elizabethan England, far more so than in the modern world. A flock of 180 sheep is worth more than the average detached house. The difficulties of transportation mean that the food supply depends heavily on what grows locally and how much surplus is available. It also depends on the season.

Which statement is a logical inference based on details in the passage?

During the Elizabethan period, food was often scarce.
During the Elizabethan period, houses were very cheap.
During the Elizabethan period, sheep were in short supply.
During the Elizabethan period, food was mainly shipped in.

a.
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

If you are hungry, you might feel inclined to turn to poaching. But be careful: this is risky. Taking livestock is theft, and theft is a felony which carries the death sentence. Killing wild animals that live on another man’s land is also against the law; even taking a single fish from a river can result in a fine of a shilling or more. It is unlikely that you will be hanged for taking a wild animal such as a rabbit; but, even so, you will get a fine amounting to three times the value of the animal as well as three months in prison, and you will have to enter into a bond to guarantee your good behavior in the future; a second offense will be treated more harshly. If a gamekeeper attacks you and you defend yourself, you can be charged with assault. You may find yourself on the gallows if you injure him.

Which detail from the text best supports the inference that farm animals were very valuable in Elizabethan England?

Taking livestock is theft, and theft is a felony which carries the death sentence.
Killing wild animals that live on another man’s land is also against the law . . .
It is unlikely that you will be hanged for taking a wild animal such as a rabbit . . .
If a gamekeeper attacks you and you defend yourself, you can be charged with assault.

a.
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

The underlying reasons for such differences are not hard to find. In a society in which people still starve to death, an orchard is not a beautiful thing in itself: its beauty lies in the fact that it produces apples and cider. A wide flat field is “finer” than rugged terrain for it can be tilled easily to produce wheat and so represents good white bread. A small thatched cottage, which a modern viewer might consider pretty, will be considered unattractive by an Elizabethan traveler, for cottagers are generally poor and able to offer little in the way of hospitality. Ranges of hills and mountains are obstacles to Elizabethan travelers and very far from picturesque features you go out of your way to see. Hills might feature in an Elizabethan writer’s description of a county because of their potential for sheep grazing, but on the whole he will be more concerned with listing all the houses of the gentry, their seats and parks.

Which detail gives implicit information about the modern view of the Elizabethan landscape?

In a society in which people still starve to death, an orchard is not a beautiful thing in itself: its beauty lies in the fact that it produces apples and cider.
A wide flat field is “finer” than rugged terrain for it can be tilled easily to produce wheat and so represents good white bread.
Ranges of hills and mountains are obstacles to Elizabethan travelers and very far from picturesque features you go out of your way to see.
Hills might feature in an Elizabethan writer’s description of a county because of their potential for sheep grazing, but on the whole he will be more concerned with listing all the houses of the gentry, their seats and parks.

c.
Which sentence is an example of an objective summary?

Elizabethans had some interesting ideas about disease.
Malaria was common in marshy areas where mosquitoes bred.
Studying humors seems like a ridiculous medical practice.
Obviously, English citizens should have left the swampy regions.

b.
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

Serious though influenza and malaria are, they are not the biggest killers of the age. That title belongs to the plague or “pestilence.” No one knows precisely how many die over the course of the reign but the total is probably around 250,000. In 1565 the people of Bristol count up the plague victims for that year and arrive at the figure of 2,070, almost 20 percent of the population. Ten years later, after another deadly outbreak, they record a further 2,000 fatalities.

What is the central idea of this paragraph?

Another name for the plague in the 1500s was “the pestilence.”
In 1565 almost 20 percent of the population died of the plague.
The plague was the most deadly disease of the Elizabethan era.
Malaria and influenza killed almost as many people as the plague.

c.
Which line best helps develop the central idea that the plague was almost impossible for Elizabethans to survive?

“Although there are no fewer than twenty-three medical treatises . . . none of them will help you.”
“But you have the advantage of knowing that a fleabite can convey the plague . . .”
“Also, plague is most frequently transferred between people in towns, and it dies down in winter . . .”
“Change your clothes and bedclothes regularly, and wash them thoroughly.”

a.
A summary is a statement of a text’s central ideas in one’s .
” own words”
When providing an objective summary of a text, writers should

directly quote the text.
avoid central ideas.
include their opinions.
exclude personal opinions.

d.
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

There is no concept of “health and safety” in Elizabethan England, so you will inevitably feel vulnerable when you arrive. Nauseating smells and sights will assail your senses; contemporary standards of cleanliness will worry you. People die every day from unknown ailments, the young as often as the old. Infectious diseases periodically kill thousands within a few weeks. Even when plague is not in town, it lurks as an anxiety in the back of people’s minds and, when it does strike, their worry turns to terror. On top of the illnesses, the chances of being attacked and hurt are much higher than in the modern world, and workplace injuries are far more common.

What is the central idea of this paragraph?

Infectious diseases, like the plague, killed many people.
Infectious diseases were a great source of concern.
Elizabethans faced health challenges similar to ours today.
Elizabethans faced a variety of challenges in staying healthy.

d.
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

Perhaps the most difficult thing to come to terms with is the scale of death. Influenza, for example, is an affliction which you no doubt have come across. However, you have never encountered anything like Elizabethan flu. It arrives in December 1557 and lasts for eighteen months. In the ten-month period August 1558 to May 1559 the annual death rate almost trebles to 7.2 percent (normally it is 2.5 percent). More than 150,000 people die from it—5 percent of the population. This is proportionally much worse than the great influenza pandemic of 1918-19 (0.53 percent mortality). Another familiar disease is malaria, which Elizabethans refer to as ague or fever.

Which sentence best helps readers determine the central idea of the paragraph?

“Perhaps the most difficult thing to come to terms with is the scale of death.”
“However, you have never encountered anything like Elizabethan flu.”‘
“Influenza, for example, is an affliction which you no doubt have come across.”
“Another familiar disease is malaria, which Elizabethans refer to as ague or fever.”

a.
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

Elizabethan people suffer from some afflictions that no longer exist in modern England. Plague is the obvious example but it is by no means the only one. Sweating sickness kills tens of thousands of people on its first appearance in 1485 and periodically thereafter. It is a terrifying disease because sufferers die within hours. It doesn’t return after a particularly bad outbreak in 1556 but people do not know whether it has gone for good; they still fear it, and it continues to be part of the medical landscape for many years.

How does the paragraph develop the central idea that Elizabethans suffered from diseases that are unfamiliar to modern readers?

It lists diseases found only in modern England.
It describes the plague in great detail.
It gives a description of the English landscape.
It provides the example of sweating sickness.

d.
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

The grim reality is that plague in the capital is as common as the stench of the cesspits and almost as unavoidable. You cannot predict where it will strike: People living next door to infected houses are left unaffected. Some people are not touched even when others in their own house have it.

READ:  AP Euro Primary Sources Renaissance Test

Which sentence best summarizes the excerpt?

The plague was unavoidable, and unpredictable in regards to whom it would affect.
The plague was associated with filthy cesspits. It was a dirty disease with a foul odor.
People in diseased homes should certainly have left immediately to avoid infection.
The capital was the center of all medical care, and Elizabethans came for treatment.

a.
What should writers do when summarizing a text? Check all that apply.

They should include minor details.
They should state their personal beliefs and opinions.
They should restate the text’s central ideas.
They should include important supporting details.
They should use objective language.

3,4,5
Read the excerpt from Queen Elizabeth’s Response to Parliament’s Request That She Marry.

For I assure you (what credit my assurance may have with you, I cannot tell, but what credit it shall deserve to have, the sequel shall declare) I will never in that matter conclude any thing that shall be prejudicial to the realm. For the weal, good and safety whereof, I will never shun to spend my life.

Which excerpt from Queen Elizabeth’s Address to the Troops at Tilbury shares the common purpose of persuading her audience that she is willing to do what is best for England?

We have been persuaded by some that are careful of our safety to take heed how we commit our selves to armed multitudes, for fear of treachery.
I am come amongst you, as you see, at this time, not for my recreation and disport, but being resolved in the midst and heat of the battle, to live or die among you all.
I know I have the body but of a weak and feeble woman; but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too.

b
In the excerpts from Address to the Troops at Tilbury and Response to Parliament’s Request That She Marry, which best describes the types of rhetorical appeals used by Queen Elizabeth to convince her audience that she was trustworthy?

She used an appeal to logos when addressing both the troops and members of Parliament.
She used an appeal to logos when addressing the troops and an appeal to pathos when addressing Parliament.
She used an appeal to pathos when addressing both the troops and members of Parliament.
She used an appeal to pathos when addressing the troops and an appeal to logos when addressing Parliament.

c
Which excerpts from Queen Elizabeth’s Response to Parliament’s Request That She Marry rely on a rhetorical appeal to logos to persuade her audience that even if she produced an heir it would not guarantee England’s prosperity or safety? Check all that apply.

I give you all my hearty thanks for the good zeal and loving care you seem to have.
You may well assure yourselves, my meaning is not to determine any thing.
I always continued in this determination, although my youth and words may seem to some hardly to agree together, yet is it most true.
The realm shall not remain destitute of any heir that may be a fit governour, and peradventure more beneficial to the realm.
For though I be never so careful of your well-doing, and mind ever so to be, yet may my issue grow out of kind, and become perhaps ungracious.

4,5
Read the excerpt from Queen Elizabeth’s Response to Parliament’s Request That She Marry.

The realm shall not remain destitute of any heir that may be a fit governour, and peradventure more beneficial to the realm, than such offspring as may come of me: For though I be never so careful of your well-doing, and mind ever so to be, yet may my issue grow out of kind, and become perhaps ungracious.

Which statement best describes Queen Elizabeth’s use of rhetorical appeals in this excerpt?

She relies on logos by listing for Parliament some of her personal reasons for wanting to remain unmarried and childless.
She relies on pathos by attempting to make the members of Parliament feel sorry for her and the fact that she is unmarried and childless.
She relies on logos by providing reasons why Parliament should not worry about the fact that she is unmarried and childless.
She relies on pathos by making the members of Parliament feel foolish for worrying about the fact that she is unmarried and childless.

c
Read the excerpt from Queen Elizabeth’s Response to Parliament’s Request That She Marry.

For I assure you (what credit my assurance may have with you, I cannot tell, but what credit it shall deserve to have, the sequel shall declare) I will never in that matter conclude any thing that shall be prejudicial to the realm. For the weal, good and safety whereof, I will never shun to spend my life; and whomsoever it shall be my chance to light upon, I trust he shall be such, as shall be as careful for the realm as you; I will not say as myself, because I cannot so certainly determine of any other, but by my desire he shall be such as shall be as careful for the preservation of the realm and you, as myself.

In this excerpt, Queen Elizabeth says “for the weal, good and safety whereof, I will never shun to spend my life” in order to

convince her audience that she is unbiased, intelligent, and rarely makes mistakes.
inform her audience that she will work hard to win back the broken trust of her followers.
persuade her audience that she will never make personal decisions that will harm England.
remind her audience that she is the ruler and in charge of enacting laws that protect England.

c
Read the excerpt from Queen Elizabeth’s Response to Parliament’s Request That She Marry.

The realm shall not remain destitute of any heir that may be a fit governour, and peradventure more beneficial to the realm, than such offspring as may come of me: For though I be never so careful of your well-doing, and mind ever so to be, yet may my issue grow out of kind, and become perhaps ungracious.

What is Queen Elizabeth’s purpose in this excerpt?

to persuade Parliament that the method of choosing successors to the throne based simply on birthright needs to be revised
to persuade Parliament that her child should not be considered a possible choice for successor to the English throne
to persuade Parliament that simply because she has a child does not guarantee that the child will be a competent ruler
to persuade Parliament how catastrophic it could be if they acted ungraciously toward her or her child

c
Read the excerpts from Queen Elizabeth’s speeches.

How does the rhetorical appeal used in these excerpts from Queen Elizabeth’s Address to the Troops at Tilbury and Response to Parliament’s Request That She Marry compare?

Both use an appeal to logos by providing a reason to support her purpose.
Both use an appeal to ethos by providing a reason why she should be trusted.
Both use an appeal to logos by encouraging her audience to show strength.
Both use an appeal to ethos by listing credentials to support her credibility.

a
Read the excerpts from Queen Elizabeth’s speeches.

In excerpts from both Address to the Troops at Tilbury and Response to Parliament’s Request That She Marry, Queen Elizabeth uses a rhetorical appeal to

pathos by encouraging her audience to feel emotions including pride.
logos by reminding her audience that they will be rewarded for their work.
pathos by making her audience feel ashamed for doubting her capabilities.
logos by providing her audience with a list of the reasons why she is grateful.

a
In Queen Elizabeth’s Address to the Troops at Tilbury, phrases such as “my faithful and loving people,” “the loyal hearts and good will of my subjects,” and “you have deserved rewards and crowns” are examples of a rhetorical appeal to

pathos because she is encouraging the troops by explaining exactly why she has faith in them.
pathos because she is encouraging the troops by attempting to elicit their feelings of loyalty.
logos because she is encouraging the troops by reminding them of rewards they will receive.
logos because she is encouraging the troops by listing the reasons England is relying on them.

b
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

So much grain is produced in 1592 that Francis Bacon proudly declares that England can now afford to feed other nations as well as her own people. It is an unfortunate remark, for it is very soon followed by a great dearth. The harvest of 1594 is poor, that of 1595 is worse, and the following year worse still: wheat hits 170 percent of its normal price, oats reach a level of 191 percent, and rye has to be imported from Denmark. Other bad years—when the price of grain is 20 percent or more above the rolling average—are 1573, 1586, and 1600. The year 1590 is almost as bad, made worse by the high cost of livestock. Prices for animal products hit new heights and never really diminish.

Which detail from the text best supports the inference that many Elizabethans could not afford to buy grain during some years?

. . . Francis Bacon proudly declares that England can now afford to feed other nations as well as her own people.
Other bad years—when the price of grain is 20 percent or more above the rolling average—are 1573, 1586, and 1600.
The year 1590 is almost as bad, made worse by the high cost of livestock.
Prices for animal products hit new heights and never really diminish.

b
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

For the vast majority of yeomen in the country, it is vitally important to store hard fruit through the whole year. To do this, select faultless apples and pears without a bruise or other mark, and leave a length of stalk on them. Place them carefully in your fruit house or “hoard house” on clean dry straw, make sure they are not touching each other, and turn them very carefully every month to avoid their collecting moisture. And, most important, keep the door to the fruit house shut, “lest children make havoc there.”

Which detail from the text best supports the inference that one bad apple can spoil all the others?

. . . it is vitally important to store hard fruit through the whole year.
Place them carefully in your fruit house or “hoard house” on clean dry straw . . .
. . . make sure they are not touching each other . . .
. . . turn them very carefully every month to avoid their collecting moisture.

c
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

The purpose of fasting on Wednesdays is specifically to encourage the eating of fish, to support the fishing industry. People therefore respond differently. Some households uphold the old religious fasts during Advent and Lent, as if they are still observing the religious law; others ignore Advent but observe the Lenten fast. Still others ignore Wednesdays and just fast on Fridays and Saturdays.

Why does the author use third-person point of view in this excerpt?

The author wants to present factual information effectively.
The author wants to draw the reader deeper into the experience.
The author wants to directly address the audience.
The author wants to persuade the reader of his idea.

a
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

Food is valuable in Elizabethan England, far more so than in the modern world. A flock of 180 sheep is worth more than the average detached house. The difficulties of transportation mean that the food supply depends heavily on what grows locally and how much surplus is available. It also depends on the season. Harvest is obviously a time of much grain and fruit.

Which ideas are implicitly stated in the excerpt? Check all that apply.

Food was more valuable in Elizabethan times than it is today.
Detached houses are cheaper than large flocks of sheep.
Difficulty in food transportation limited food availability.
Not many Elizabethans ate exotic fruit.
Food was more scarce during the winter months.
More people had food during harvest season.

4,5,6
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

Describing a landscape is thus a matter of perspective: your priorities affect what you see. Asked to describe their county, most Devonians will mention the great city of Exeter, the ports of Dartmouth, Plymouth, and Barnstaple, and the dozens of market towns. They will generally neglect to mention that the region is dominated by a great moor, Dartmoor, two thousand feet high in places and over two hundred square miles in expanse. There are no roads across this wasteland, only track ways. Elizabethans see it as good for nothing but pasture, tin mining, and the steady water supply it provides by way of the rivers that rise there.

Which detail gives explicit information about Elizabethans’ perception of the moor?

Describing a landscape is thus a matter of perspective: your priorities affect what you see.
Asked to describe their county, most Devonians will mention the great city of Exeter . . .
There are no roads across this wasteland, only track ways.
Elizabethans see it as good for nothing but pasture, tin mining, and the steady water supply it provides . . .

d
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

Elizabethan people also consider their health when choosing what to eat. “I eat rye bread not for niggardliness but for a point of physic,” declares William Horman. This is unsurprising: we do much the same in the modern world. But our ideas about healthy food are very different from Elizabethan ones. For example, while we make use of sage in our cooking on account of its taste, Elizabethans use it because it is thought to sharpen the brain.

What is the effect of the first-person point of view in this excerpt?

Readers get direct advice about which foods to incorporate in their own diets.
Readers are personally drawn into the culture of Elizabethan England.
Readers receive a good representation of what was considered healthy food in Elizabethan England.
Readers see the differences between themselves and people of another time period.

d
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

But be careful if you adopt a partial regime: heavy fines are levied for eating meat on nonmeat days. The standard fine is £3 or three months imprisonment, but in 1561 a London butcher slaughtering three oxen in Lent is fined £20. Fines can be levied on the head of a household for every single member who breaks the fast, so if you have lots of servants, make sure they all obey the law.

What is the effect of the second-person point of view in this excerpt?

It allows the reader to personally experience the effects of hunger during Elizabethan England.
It puts the reader in the place of the Elizabethan who has to pay fines for eating meat.
It explains to the reader which types of food were acceptable during Lent.
It describes the difficulties of being the head of an Elizabethan household.

b
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

The underlying reasons for such differences are not hard to find. In a society in which people still starve to death, an orchard is not a beautiful thing in itself: its beauty lies in the fact that it produces apples and cider. A wide flat field is “finer” than rugged terrain for it can be tilled easily to produce wheat and so represents good white bread. A small thatched cottage, which a modern viewer might consider pretty, will be considered unattractive by an Elizabethan traveler, for cottagers are generally poor and able to offer little in the way of hospitality. Ranges of hills and mountains are obstacles to Elizabethan travelers and very far from picturesque features you go out of your way to see. Hills might feature in an Elizabethan writer’s description of a county because of their potential for sheep grazing, but on the whole he will be more concerned with listing all the houses of the gentry, their seats and parks.

Which detail gives implicit information about the modern view of the Elizabethan landscape?

In a society in which people still starve to death, an orchard is not a beautiful thing in itself: its beauty lies in the fact that it produces apples and cider.
A wide flat field is “finer” than rugged terrain for it can be tilled easily to produce wheat and so represents good white bread.
Ranges of hills and mountains are obstacles to Elizabethan travelers and very far from picturesque features you go out of your way to see.
Hills might feature in an Elizabethan writer’s description of a county because of their potential for sheep grazing, but on the whole he will be more concerned with listing all the houses of the gentry, their seats and parks.

c
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

In such circumstances, storage of food is most important. The principal rule is to have separate places for different types of commodity: dry things can be kept in a pantry with bread and dry linen; wet things are normally stored in the buttery. Wine and meat must be kept apart, and cellars should be avoided on account of their dampness. Meat should be seethed in summer to keep it fresh, then kept in a cool cellar, soaked in vinegar with juniper seeds and salt. Most yeomen will have vats and presses for making cheeses—a valuable source of protein in the long winter season. Similarly, most livestock owners have troughs for salting meat or allowing it to steep in brine.

What is the author’s purpose in this excerpt?

to explain how easy it was to store food properly during Elizabethan times
to explain how the proper way to store food was taught to Elizabethan cooks
to explain the complexities of proper food storage during Elizabethan times
to explain the errors people made trying to store food properly during Elizabethan times

c
Which of these excerpts from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England is related from the second-person point of view?

Hills might feature in an Elizabethan writer’s description of a county because of their potential for sheep grazing . . .
Those things that Elizabethans take for granted are precisely what you will find most striking . . .
Before this, they do not need such a word, for they do not see a “landscape” as such . . .
Shakespeare does not use the word “landscape” at all; he uses the word “country” . . .

b
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

But what if it comes to the worst? What if you have painful black buboes in your groin and armpits, and experience the rapid pulse, the headaches, the terrific thirst, and delirium that are the tokens of the plague? There is little you can do. Physicians will prescribe the traditional medicines of dragon water, mithridatium, and theriac if they hear you are suffering but you will suspect that these are cynical attempts to relieve a dying person of his money. The physicians themselves will not normally come near you. Simon Forman, who does attend plague sufferers, is a rare exception: this is because he has himself survived the disease and believes he cannot catch it again.

What is the central idea of this paragraph?

Physicians could not do much for victims of the plague.
Physicians were afraid to come near patients with symptoms.
Symptoms of the plague included headaches and delirium.
Symptoms were treated with dragon water or theriac

a
When providing an objective summary of a text, writers should

directly quote the text.
avoid central ideas.
include their opinions.
exclude personal opinions.

d
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

The grim reality is that plague in the capital is as common as the stench of the cesspits and almost as unavoidable. You cannot predict where it will strike: People living next door to infected houses are left unaffected. Some people are not touched even when others in their own house have it.

Which sentence best summarizes the excerpt?

The plague was unavoidable, and unpredictable in regards to whom it would affect.
The plague was associated with filthy cesspits. It was a dirty disease with a foul odor.
People in diseased homes should certainly have left immediately to avoid infection.
The capital was the center of all medical care, and Elizabethans came for treatment.

a
A summary is a statement of a text’s central ideas in one’s .
” own words”
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

Perhaps the most difficult thing to come to terms with is the scale of death. Influenza, for example, is an affliction which you no doubt have come across. However, you have never encountered anything like Elizabethan flu. It arrives in December 1557 and lasts for eighteen months. In the ten-month period August 1558 to May 1559 the annual death rate almost trebles to 7.2 percent (normally it is 2.5 percent). More than 150,000 people die from it—5 percent of the population. This is proportionally much worse than the great influenza pandemic of 1918-19 (0.53 percent mortality). Another familiar disease is malaria, which Elizabethans refer to as ague or fever.

Which sentence best helps readers determine the central idea of the paragraph?

“Perhaps the most difficult thing to come to terms with is the scale of death.”
“However, you have never encountered anything like Elizabethan flu.”‘
“Influenza, for example, is an affliction which you no doubt have come across.”
“Another familiar disease is malaria, which Elizabethans refer to as ague or fever.”

a
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

There is no concept of “health and safety” in Elizabethan England, so you will inevitably feel vulnerable when you arrive. Nauseating smells and sights will assail your senses; contemporary standards of cleanliness will worry you. People die every day from unknown ailments, the young as often as the old. Infectious diseases periodically kill thousands within a few weeks. Even when plague is not in town, it lurks as an anxiety in the back of people’s minds and, when it does strike, their worry turns to terror. On top of the illnesses, the chances of being attacked and hurt are much higher than in the modern world, and workplace injuries are far more common.

What is the central idea of this paragraph?

Infectious diseases, like the plague, killed many people.
Infectious diseases were a great source of concern.
Elizabethans faced health challenges similar to ours today.
Elizabethans faced a variety of challenges in staying healthy.

d
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

Elizabethan people suffer from some afflictions that no longer exist in modern England. Plague is the obvious example but it is by no means the only one. Sweating sickness kills tens of thousands of people on its first appearance in 1485 and periodically thereafter. It is a terrifying disease because sufferers die within hours. It doesn’t return after a particularly bad outbreak in 1556 but people do not know whether it has gone for good; they still fear it, and it continues to be part of the medical landscape for many years.

READ:  Chapter 17 Review

How does the paragraph develop the central idea that Elizabethans suffered from diseases that are unfamiliar to modern readers?

It lists diseases found only in modern England.
It describes the plague in great detail.
It gives a description of the English landscape.
It provides the example of sweating sickness.

d
What should writers do when summarizing a text? Check all that apply.

They should include minor details.
They should state their personal beliefs and opinions.
They should restate the text’s central ideas.
They should include important supporting details.
They should use objective language.

3,4,5
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

The theory of the humors is just the basic framework into which physicians fit a number of other ideas. Galen teaches that every living thing is composed of the four elements: fire, earth, air, and water. Each of these corresponds with one of the four humors. Fire, which is said to be hot and dry, corresponds with choler; water (cold and wet) with phlegm; earth (dry and cold) with black bile; and air (hot and wet) with blood. These properties are all associated with parts of the body, so the brain is cold and moist, the kidneys hot and moist, and so on. If an imbalance in the humors clashes with the properties of an organ, the patient will be ill.

Which sentence best summarizes the excerpt?

Water was thought to be cold and wet, so it was associated with phlegm.
Elizabethans believed that the balance of the four humors would keep them healthy.
Galen taught Elizabethan doctors about fire, water, earth, and air.
Air was the most important humor because it corresponded with blood.

b
Which line best helps develop the central idea that the plague was a very deadly disease?

“Elizabethans do not understand infection and contagion as we do.”
“In 1565 the people of Bristol count up the plague victims for that year and arrive at the figure of 2,070 . . .”
“This last epidemic originates in Portugal and is brought to Devon by mariners.”
“It is ironic that the great naval ships that deliver the English from the Spanish threat bring another danger . . .”

b
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

As you approach the theaters you will notice that they all seem to be round; in fact, they are polygonal—the Globe is twenty-sided, the Rose fourteen-sided. Whichever one you choose, you can expect to queue with two thousand other people to get in. You will see people standing in hats with pipes in hand, and women in their headdresses, all chatting, with an eye open for people they know. Entrance costs a penny: this allows you to stand in the yard in front of the stage, an uncovered area (hence the need for a hat).

The purpose of the second-person point of view in the excerpt is to

emphasize how out of place the readers would feel in the past.
make the readers feel like part of the exciting theater experience.
distance the readers from the historical events described.
make the readers understand how boring a play could be.

b
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

Eight years later Francis Langley erects the Swan on a site nearby; and in 1596 Richard Burbage builds the Blackfriars Theatre, an indoor venue, although it does not open its doors until 1599. Most important of all, Shakespeare, Richard and Cuthbert Burbage, and their partners dismantle The Theatre and remove its beams to a new site at Southwark, where it is rebuilt in 1599 as the Globe. When Edward Alleyn builds the Fortune on the northern edge of the city in 1600, the array of Elizabethan theaters is complete.

How does the author effectively show the establishment of Elizabethan theaters?

by using a humorous and lighthearted tone.
by randomly listing when certain theaters were built in the past.
by using a grave and critical tone.
by listing in chronological order when several important theaters were built.

d
Which excerpt from the text signals the sequence of events?

“Unfortunately this is located too far from the city . . .”
“The queen continues to encourage dramatic art . . .”
“Eight years later Francis Langley erects the Swan . . .”
“Thomas Nashe brings forth his masterpiece . . .”

c
Organization, tone, and word choice should be considered when evaluating effective

definitions and key terms.
grammar and punctuation.
transitions and introductions.
text structure and style.

d
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

By the end of the reign he has married, had two children and lost one, tried to become an actor and failed, become a playwright, been arrested for a scurrilous play and released, killed another actor in a duel, been arrested again and put on trial for murder, and escaped hanging by pleading benefit of the clergy. The play for which he is arrested, The Isle of Dogs, coauthored with Thomas Nashe, is so slanderous and offensive that the privy council orders the closure not just of the play but of every theater in London.

Which event most directly caused the council to order the closure of all theaters in London?

Jonson becoming a playwright
Jonson and Nashe writing The Isle of Dogs
the clergy pardoning Jonson
the actor being killed in a duel

b
What does a chronological text structure use to signal the sequence of time?

causes and effects
reactions to events
words or dates
responses to events

c
What should a reader consider when tracing chronological text structure? Check all that apply.

the meaning behind the events
the causal relationships between events
the responses and reactions to events
the factors that influence events
the author’s purpose in describing the events

2,3,4
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

In their stead, people increasingly choose to see secular plays on historical and moral themes. These are performed up and down the country by theater companies called after lords, for example “Lord Sussex’s Men,” “Lord Strange’s Men,” “the Lord Admiral’s Men,” and “Lord Leicester’s Men.” The reason for these names is that, while unattached actors are liable to be arrested for vagrancy, the Act of 1572 specifically excludes players properly authorized by lords from being considered vagabonds.

Which factor directly influenced the names of the theater companies?

the Act of 1572
the play Lord Sussex’s Men
the historical and moral themes
the leading actors

a
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

More theaters open their doors to the public. The Rose is built by Philip Henslowe at Southwark, not far from the bear-baiting and bull-baiting arenas, in 1587. Eight years later Francis Langley erects the Swan on a site nearby; and in 1596 Richard Burbage builds the Blackfriars Theatre, an indoor venue, although it does not open its doors until 1599.

Which theater opened last?

Southwark
the Swan
the Rose
Blackfriars

d
Descriptive details help the reader

eliminate unnecessary information.
present information in a logical way.
organize details in order of importance.
envision a concept or scenario.

d
Lukas follows these steps when reading a text.

Identify the author’s purpose.
Analyze elements of the author’s style.
Determine how the style supports the purpose.
Lukas is the author’s style.

evaluating
Read the passage from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

If you want to know which years are a good time to visit and which years to avoid, the following is a guide to the extremes. The years of greatest plenty—i.e., those in which the price of grain is 20 percent or more below the average—are 1564, 1566, 1569-71, 1583-84, 1587-88, 1592-93, and 1602, the very best being 1592 and 1593, when grain prices are just 56 percent and 65 percent of the average.

The author’s objective tone is effective because it helps readers to

analyze the information logically.
enjoy the humor in the information.
feel excited about the information.
engage with the information emotionally.

a
The purpose of adding relevant evidence to a paragraph is to

add a point.
support a point.
introduce a topic.
conclude a topic.

b
Read the literary analysis paragraph.

In Parasite, author Mira Grant’s writing style helps readers examine the dangers of medical technology. Grant uses precise wording to help readers grasp advanced medical concepts. Her clear style allows readers to explore a world that might otherwise be beyond them.

What is the best thing for the writer to add to the paragraph to make it more effective?

a concluding statement
a specific point
supporting evidence
a topic sentence

c
At what point should a writer introduce evidence in a paragraph?

in the topic sentence
before making a point
after making a point
in the concluding statement

c
Read the passage from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

1.) It is easy to write the line “people starve to death”; it is much harder to deal with the harsh reality. 2.) But you need to understand this point, if only to see how little choice you might have in what you eat. 3.) The itinerant poor might literally die in the street.

In what way is the second sentence effective?

It highlights the number of impoverished people in Elizabethan England.
It explains how the reader can avoid dealing with the hungry poor.
It illustrates how the diet of Elizabethan England can benefit the reader.
It emphasizes why this passage is important to the reader personally.

d
Read the sentence.

The playwright created a tragedy with nice characterizations.

Which underlined word would be the best to replace in order to create more precise wording?

playwright
tragedy
nice
characterizations

c
To analyze an author’s style, which elements should the reader identify? Check all that apply.

audience
plot
point of view
tone
word choice

3,4,5
Read the literary analysis paragraph.

Shakespeare’s writing style reveals information about attitudes toward the landscape. His precise word choice provides detailed descriptions of the outdoors. In Titus Andronicus, he uses words like “ruthless,” “vast,” and “gloomy” to describe forests. Although he is known as the “playwright’s playwright,” Shakespeare could have been a travel guide.

Which sentence from the paragraph contains the best use of domain-specific vocabulary?

Shakespeare’s writing style reveals information about attitudes toward the landscape.
His precise word choice provides detailed descriptions of the outdoors.
In Titus Andronicus, he uses words like “ruthless,” “vast,” and “gloomy” to describe forests.
Although he is known as the “playwright’s playwright,” Shakespeare could have been a travel guide.

b
Read the passage from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

There are no roads across this wasteland, only track ways. Elizabethans see it as good for nothing but pasture, tin mining, and the steady water supply it provides by way of the rivers that rise there. Many people are afraid of such moors and forests. They are “the ruthless, vast and gloomy woods . . . by nature made for murders and for rapes,” as Shakespeare writes in Titus Andronicus. Certainly no one will think of Dartmoor as beautiful. Sixteenth-century artists paint wealthy people, prosperous cities, and food, not landscapes.

What is the effect of the author’s word choice in the passage?

It creates a condescending tone that conveys the author’s dislike of the countryside.
It supports the author’s purpose of challenging the image of the romantic countryside.
It emphasizes the author’s position that travelers should go visit the countryside.
It uses second-person point of view to compare the author’s and reader’s views of the countryside.

b
Read the passage.

If you’re looking for a place to visit, I recommend Yosemite National Park. Visiting Yosemite has been a high point of my life. Can you imagine waking up, inhaling the pine-scented air, and watching the pink-tinted mountains reflect the sunrise? Later, as you hike, you’ll encounter meadows strewn with rainbows of wildflowers and lakes in astonishing shades of blue.

The tone of the passage is effective because it

defines Yosemite for the reader.
helps the author entertain the reader.
instructs the reader on how to enjoy Yosemite.
supports the author’s attempt to persuade.

d
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

The following examples show how famine hits the Cumberland parish of Greystoke. Here “a poor fellow destitute of succor” is found in the highway and is carried to the constable’s house, where he dies. A miller’s daughter dies in her bed, weakened from lack of food. A beggar boy from the Scottish Borders is found writhing in agony in the road and dies soon afterward “in great misery.” Another “poor, hunger-starved beggar boy” is found in the street and carried into a house, where he dies. A widow is discovered dead in a barn. A four-year-old local boy dies “for want of food and means,” as does his mother. A total of sixty-two people die in Greystoke in just one year—during which time the parish sees no marriages and only three children conceived. You hear the story of a man leaving his home and walking hundreds of miles in search of work or food and returning after a couple of months with sufficient money only to find that his wife and children have all since died.

The details from this excerpt best support the inference that

death from starvation was common in Elizabethan England.
very few people died of starvation in Elizabethan England.
communities were shocked by the deaths from starvation.
communities tried to prevent the deaths from starvation.

a
Which statements describe the central ideas of a text? Check all that apply.

They explain helpful details.
They are the most important ideas in a text.
They give examples of key ideas.
They are supported by details.
They can be explicitly stated or implied.

2.4.5
Read the sentence.

We laughed when we read the writing from that TV show.

The best reason to replace writing with clever comedic script is

to clarify the point of view.
to create precise wording.
to improve the tone.
to change the style.

b
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

Sir Thomas Elyot is worth listening to on this subject. Although he is a layman and not a physician, his book, The Castel of Health, proves hugely influential—it goes into its sixteenth edition in 1595. He declares that mutton is the most wholesome meat you can eat and that fish is not so good because it thins the blood. He also thinks that spices and vegetables are bad for you.

Why does the author use the second-person point of view in this excerpt?

The author wants to describe the time period accurately.
The author wants to create a convincing argument.
The author wants to present factual information effectively.
The author wants to help the reader relate to the subject thoughtfully.

d
Read the literary analysis paragraph.

Shakespeare’s writing style reveals information about attitudes toward the landscape. His precise word choice provides detailed descriptions of the outdoors. In Titus Andronicus, he uses words like “ruthless,” “vast,” and “gloomy” to describe forests. Although he is known as the “playwright’s playwright,” Shakespeare could have been a travel guide.

In which sentence does the author provide relevant evidence?

Shakespeare’s writing style reveals information about attitudes toward the landscape.
His precise word choice provides detailed descriptions of the outdoors.
In Titus Andronicus, he uses words like “ruthless,” “vast,” and “gloomy” to describe forests.
Although he is known as the “playwright’s playwright,” Shakespeare could have been a travel guide.

c
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

People believe that the balance of the humors is also upset by eating too much or too little of something. As noted in the previous chapter, Thomas Elyot believes that fish and fresh fruit are bad for you, and that white bread is more nutritious than bread with the bran. William Horman maintains that drinking cold liquids after prolonged activity is very dangerous for the health. Richard Carew states that the “eating of fish, especially newly taken and of the livers, gives rise to leprosy.” Although you will know that brown bread is more nutritious than white, and that fish does not cause leprosy, you will probably agree with the general idea—that what you ingest affects your health.

How does the paragraph develop the central idea that Elizabethans believed that the body’s humors affected health?

It details how diet could disrupt the balance of humors.
It explains that fresh fish may cause liver disease.
It discourages the use of cold liquids after activity.
It recommends eliminating fresh fruit from a healthy diet.

a
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

Simon Forman, who does attend plague sufferers, is a rare exception: this is because he has himself survived the disease and believes he cannot catch it again. However, his remedy amounts to little more than avoiding eating onions and keeping warm. He has a recipe for getting rid of the plague sores that will afflict you afterward if you survive the disease; but that is a very big “if.” It seems the best advice is provided by Nicholas Bownd in his book Medicines for the Plague: “In these dangerous times God must be our only defense.”

Which lines best summarize the excerpt?

Keeping warm and eating onions was the only way to avoid the plague. This treatment was recommended by Nicholas Bownd.
Some Elizabethans believed that diet caused the plague. Nicholas Bownd suggested praying to God as the only cure.
Writer Simon Forman believed that God was the only answer to the plague. He survived the disease and ate warm onions to treat his sores.
While doctors like Simon Forman tried to help, others such as Nicholas Bownd relied on their faith in God.

d
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

Another familiar disease is malaria, which Elizabethans refer to as ague or fever. You might associate this with more tropical countries of the modern world but in marshy areas in sixteenth-century England, such as the Lincolnshire and Cambridgeshire Fens, the Norfolk Broads, and Romney Marsh in Kent, it kills thousands. No one suspects that it has anything to do with mosquitoes; rather people believe it is the corrupted air arising from the low-lying dank marsh (hence the term mal-aria). As a result, you will have no chance of getting proper treatment for the disease.

How does the paragraph expand on the central idea that malaria was a deadly disease in Elizabethan England?

It proves that malaria is spread by mosquitoes in swampy areas.
It gives a detailed description of the area known as Romney Marsh.
It explains Elizabethan misconceptions about the spread of malaria.
It compares common malaria symptoms to influenza symptoms.

c
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

A miller’s daughter dies in her bed, weakened from lack of food. A beggar boy from the Scottish Borders is found writhing in agony in the road and dies soon afterward “in great misery.” Another “poor, hunger-starved beggar boy” is found in the street and carried into a house, where he dies. A widow is discovered dead in a barn. A four-year-old local boy dies “for want of food and means,” as does his mother. A total of sixty-two people die in Greystoke in just one year—during which time the parish sees no marriages and only three children conceived. You hear the story of a man leaving his home and walking hundreds of miles in search of work or food and returning after a couple of months with sufficient money only to find that his wife and children have all since died. Now you can see why so many people living in Kent in the 1590s walked there, as we have seen in Chapter Two.

Which details give explicit examples of starvation during Elizabethan times? Check all that apply.

A miller’s daughter dies in her bed, weakened from lack of food.
A beggar boy from the Scottish Borders is found writhing in agony in the road and dies soon afterward “in great misery.”
Another “poor, hunger-starved beggar boy” is found in the street and carried into a house, where he dies.
A four-year-old local boy dies “for want of food and means,” as does his mother.
You hear the story of a man leaving his home and walking hundreds of miles in search of work or food and returning after a couple of months with sufficient money only to find that his wife and children have all since died.
Now you can see why so many people living in Kent in the 1590s walked there, as we have seen in Chapter Two.

1,2,3,4,5
A chronological text structure presents events

from least important to most important.
in a random, unorganized way.
in the order in which they occur.
from most important to least important.

c
Read the excerpt from The Time Traveler’s Guide to Elizabethan England.

When the trumpets sound, most people quieten down, waiting for the play to begin. If you are sitting in the gallery you will have a clear view of the stage as it projects out from the far side of the round enclosure. Leading actors will come right out along this platform and deliver their soliloquies directly to the crowd. So too will a clown like Will Kempe, when he wishes to extemporize and make “a scurvy face.” There are two large columns, both elaborately painted, which support the roof that covers the back of the stage.

How does the author effectively describe the experience of watching an Elizabethan play?

The author uses a serious tone and a third-person point of view to effectively describe the experience.
The author uses descriptive details and a first-person point of view to effectively describe the experience.
The author uses a critical tone and a third-person point of view to effectively describe the experience.
The author uses descriptive details and a second-person point of view to effectively describe the experience.

d
Implicit information requires the reader to combine details from the text with background knowledge to make a(n) .
inference
An author’s is the particular way in which the author writes.
style
Read the excerpts from Queen Elizabeth’s speeches.

How does the purpose of the excerpt from Queen Elizabeth’s Address to the Troops at Tilbury compare to the excerpt from Response to Parliament’s Request That She Marry?

Both excerpts inform Queen Elizabeth’s audience of her strategic plans for engaging and defeating the invading army.
Both excerpts attempt to persuade Queen Elizabeth’s audience that she is willing to sacrifice her life for England’s well-being.
Both excerpts inform Queen Elizabeth’s audience of the reasons she has come to passionately love and defend England.
Both excerpts attempt to persuade Queen Elizabeth’s audience that she is the most capable ruler the country has known.

b

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Life in the renaissance
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Queen Elizabeth most likely used different rhetorical appeals in her Address to the Troops at Tilbury and her Response to Parliament's Request That She Marry due to differences in wealth and upbringing. age and education. audience and purpose. location and gender.
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2017-09-06 05:33:18
Life in the renaissance
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