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The Backbones of the Reformation

On the thirty-first of October in 1517, our history teachers claim that Martin Luther (a small-town monk) wrote a contentious document known as the Ninety-Five Theses, and marched up to a castle church in Wittenberg, nailing it to the Church door. That very action fueled the already perilous vendetta going on between the Catholics and Protestants. When delving deeper into this legend, Professor Andrew Pettegree, an expert on the Reformation from the University of St. Andrews, Scotland claims that, “The drama of Luther walking through Wittenberg with his hammer and his nails is very, very unlikely to have happened,” (Pettegree).

He adds on that, “The castle church door was the normal noticeboard of the university. This was not an act of defiance on Luther’s part, it was simply what you did to make a formal publication. It would probably have been pasted to the door rather than nailed up” (Pettegree). A quincentenary passes last year and this legend is still controversial. In the comments section of the article from Time, many students asked why they were not taught correctly. Many adults also claimed to have never been taught about this and wondered what other lies or myths were being taught within the schools and why. Not only are we not being taught truthfully, but information of major importance about the Reformation was also being pushed aside and overlooked.

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Teachers force-feed students in history class that the patriarchy did everything when, in reality, women were also a part of the big picture. Women may not have fought in wars or nailed a contradictory sheet of paper to a church door, but, they have been there by the men’s side. Whether it was cooking, cleaning, or caring for children, women have yet to go noticed for all the arduous work they put in to make sure everything ran smoothly amongst all the chaos going on.

Elisabeth Von Braunschweig was a renegade. Daughter of a duchess, Elisabeth Von Braunschweig was always an independent woman and was even more independent after becoming a widow, she started a Reformation right in her own neighborhood and because of that powerful men of the Reformation supported her. I find her inspiring because she did what she believed in and never considered herself weak because she was a woman. I believe she also motivated other women to believe in themselves and gave them the confidence to start speaking out instead of letting men do the speaking for them. She has been portrayed as one of the, “more influential women in the politics of the Reformation . . . even more than her mother” (Bainton).

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The Backbones of the Reformation
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On the thirty-first of October in 1517, our history teachers claim that Martin Luther (a small-town monk) wrote a contentious document known as the Ninety-Five Theses, and marched up to a castle church in Wittenberg, nailing it to the Church door. That very action fueled the already perilous vendetta going on between the Catholics and Protestants. When delving deeper into this legend, Professor Andrew Pettegree, an expert on the Reformation from the University of St. Andrews, Scotland claims tha
2021-04-09 09:19:47
The Backbones of the Reformation
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