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Caliban and Prospero Essay

In our Drama lesson, we were given an extract from act one, scene two, from a Shakespeare play, called the Tempest. We had to make the audience side with Caliban or Prospero. We chose to make the audience side with Caliban. We did this with these communication skills: Facial expression, tone of voice, body movement, posture, muscle tension and gesture. This is what we did and why: When Caliban says ‘as wicked dew as e’er my mother brushed with raven’s feather from unwholesome fen drop on you both.

A south-west blow on ye and blister you all o’er.’ Caliban will be sat on the floor, this will make him seem weak and formulate the audience sympathising towards him, and it makes Caliban look nervous and terrified like Prospero is bullying him. Prospero is pacing around Caliban and trying to gain eye contact with him, which makes him seem strong and confident. When ever eye contact is gained between the pair, Caliban looks away quickly, covering his eyes with hands, or looking at the floor, which also shows he is weaker.

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When Prospero says ‘for this, be sure, tonight thou shalt have cramps, Side-stitches that shall pen thy breath up. Urchins shall for that vast night that they may work all exercise on thee. Thou shalt be pinched as thick as honey comb, each pinch more stinging than bees that made ’em.’ Prospero is walking around Caliban, who is still sat on the ground. He is speaking to Caliban like he is telling him off, as a father figure. Caliban has his eyes covered with his hands in a child-like manner to show that he is petrified and sees Prospero as a threat to him and feels intimidated by him.

When Caliban says ‘I must eat my dinner’, he gets up and starts to walk away anxiously getting faster with his head down. Just before he leaves the stage he stop, and stands still for a moment to add tension, then he turns around, with the expression that he is thinking on his face. ‘This islands mine, by Sycorax my mother.’ Caliban says in a reasoning tone of voice. ‘Which thou tak’st from me. When thou cam’st first. Thou strok’st me, and made much of me, would’st give me. Water with berries in’t, and teach me how to name the bigger light, and how the lass that burn by day and night. And then I loved thee, and showed thee all the qualities o’th’isle, the fresh springs, brine-pits, barren place and fertile.

Cursed be I that did so! All the charms of Sycorax- toads, beetles, bats light on you! For I am all the subjects that you have, which first was mine own king: and here you sty me In this hard rock, whiles you do keep from the rest o’th’isle.’ Caliban is stood up, looking Prospero in the eye, but you can still tell he is nervous because he looks at the floor often, then building his confidence back up to look Prospero in the eye once again. Prospero looks disappointed in himself, but then, near the end of Caliban’s speech, Prospero starts to look angry. Caliban moved back and forth, and in circles in a nervous manner, meanwhile, Prospero stands still with his head held high, showing he is more confident than Caliban, and he is the stronger character.

After about ten seconds, Prospero shouts ‘Thou most lying slave,’ Caliban shies away from him as Prospero steps forwards. Prospero says ‘whom stripes may move, not kindness! I have used thee, filth as thou art, with human care, and lodged thee in mine own cell, till thou didst seek to violate the honour of my child.’ Caliban is crouched down and Prospero walks over to him, at this point, Caliban will have no choice but to scatter backwards, giving Prospero the room he requests to march forwards, making him look stronger. Prospero’s voice gets louder and scarier the more he talks.

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‘O ho, oho! Would’t have been done’ Caliban says, as if he is pleading Prospero’s forgiveness and not to be hurt. ‘Thou didst prevent me. I had peopled else this isle with Calibans.’ Caliban says this like he feels guilty and did not know he was doing wrong which makes him appear that he regrets his performance. ‘Abhorred slave’ Prospero says sharply. ‘Which any print of goodness wilt not take, being capable of all ill! I pitied thee,’ Prospero speaks down to Caliban like his feelings do not matter. ‘Took pains to make thee speak, taught thee each hour. One thing or other. When thou didst not, savage, know thine own meaning, but wouldst gabble like a thing most brutish, I endowed thy purposes with words that made them known. But thy vile race, though thou didst learn, had than in’t which good natures. Once again, Prospero treats Caliban with no respect, speaking to him like he his telling him off, Caliban holds his head in his hands.

Could not abide to be with. Therefore wast thou deservedly confined into this rock, who hadst deserved more than a prison.’ Caliban slowly peeks through his hands and, wondering weather it would be a good idea to speak up, or keen quite, he speaks up. ‘You taught me language, and my profit on’t is, I know how to curse. The red plague rid you for learning me you language.’ Prospero interrupts Caliban. ‘Hag-seed, hence!’ This makes Caliban jump and put his hands over his eyes once again. ‘Fetch us in fuel-and be quick, thou’rt best, to answer other business. Shrug’st thou, Malice? If thou neglect’st, or dost unwillingly what I command, I’ll rack thee with old cramps, fill all thy bones with aches, make thee roar, that beasts shall tremble at thy din.’

‘No I pray thee!’ Caliban says in terror, he then turns to the audience and says ‘I must obey. His art is of such power; it would control my dam’s god setebos, and make a vassal of him. He says this quietly and clearly to make the audience listen better and get them on his side. ‘So slave hence!’ Prospero shouts across the stage to Caliban. Caliban walks in a uneasy manner off the stage, as he walks past Prospero, he flinches like he things Prospero will harm him. I think we completed this task well, Prospero and Caliban repeated their actions a lot, if I could do this task again, I would try to make them do different things to make it more appealing to the audience.

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Caliban and Prospero Essay
Artscolumbia
Artscolumbia
In our Drama lesson, we were given an extract from act one, scene two, from a Shakespeare play, called the Tempest. We had to make the audience side with Caliban or Prospero. We chose to make the audience side with Caliban. We did this with these communication skills: Facial expression, tone of voice, body movement, posture, muscle tension and gesture. This is what we did and why: When Caliban says 'as wicked dew as e'er my mother brushed with raven's feather from unwholesome fen drop on you bo
2017-11-03 08:03:45
Caliban and Prospero Essay
$ 13.900 2018-12-31
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