We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy

PHYS 2212K – Final Exam Practice

They all have the same wave speed because the m/L ratio for each rope is the same. va=vb=vc.
Rank in order, from largest to smallest, the wave speeds va, vb, and vc.
They all have the same wave speed because the m/L ratio for each rope is the same. va=vb=vc.

A wave pulse travels along a stretched string at a speed of 200 cm/s .

What will be the speed if the string’s TENSION is doubled?

Eqn: v = ? (T/ µ)

We will write a custom essay sample on PHYS 2212K – Final Exam Practice specifically for you
for only $16.38 $13.9/page

Order now

If the Tension in doubled, the speed will increase by a factor of ?2.

200 cm/s × ?2 = 283 cm/s

A wave pulse travels along a stretched string at a speed of 200 cm/s .

What will be the speed if the string’s mass is quadrupled (but its length is unchanged)?

Eqn: v = ? (T/ µ) where µ = m/L

If the mass is quadrupled, the speed will decrease by a factor of ?(1/4).

200 cm/s × ?(1/4) = 100 cm/s

A wave pulse travels along a stretched string at a speed of 200 cm/s .

What will be the speed if the string’s length is quadrupled (but its mass is unchanged)?

Eqn: v = ? (T/ µ) where µ = m/L

If the length is quadrupled, the speed will increase by a factor of ?4.

200 cm/s × ?4 = 400 cm/s

Before

The figure is a history graph showing the displacement as a function of time at one point on a string.

Did the displacement at this point reach its maximum of 2 mm before or after the interval of time when the displacement was a constant 1 mm?

Before
From the history graph, the leading edge is pointed to the right, so the wave is traveling to the right. From the snapshot graph, |-2cm/0.01s| = 200 cm/s.

The figure shows a snapshot graph and a history graph for a wave pulse on a stretched string. They describe the same wave from two perspectives.

In which direction is the wave traveling and what is the speed of the wave?

From the history graph, the leading edge is pointed to the right, so the wave is traveling to the right.

From the snapshot graph, |-2cm/0.01s| = 200 cm/s.

Amplitude is the distance from the x axis to the maximum or minimum value. So A = 4.0 cm
What is the AMPLITUDE of the traveling wave in the figure?
Amplitude is the distance from the x axis to the maximum or minimum value. So A = 4.0 cm
Wavelength (?) is the distance from crest to crest or trough to trough. So ? for this traveling wave is 14m-2m. ? = 12m
What is the WAVELENGTH of the traveling wave in the figure?
Wavelength (?) is the distance from crest to crest or trough to trough. So ? for this traveling wave is 14m-2m. ? = 12m
v = ?ƒ, where ƒ = frequency. So ƒ = v/?. ƒ = (24m/s)/(12m) = 2.0 s??, or 2.0 Hz
What is the FREQUENCY of the traveling wave in the figure?
v = ?ƒ, where ƒ = frequency.
So ƒ = v/?.ƒ = (24m/s)/(12m) = 2.0 s??, or 2.0 Hz

D= A sin (?t+?) (? is the phase constant) From the graph, t=0, A=4.0cm, D=2.0cm. 2.0cm = 4.0cm sin ( ?(0) + ?) ? = arcsin (2.0cm/4.0cm) = ?/6 = .524 rad
What is the PHASE CONSTANT of the traveling wave in the figure?
D= A sin (?t+?) (? is the phase constant)
From the graph, t=0, A=4.0cm, D=2.0cm.2.0cm = 4.0cm sin ( ?(0) + ?)
? = arcsin (2.0cm/4.0cm) = ?/6 = .524 rad

Consider the general form D = Asin(kx - ?) where A amplitude, k constant, and ? phase When x = 0, observe D = A. That means that sin(kx - ?) = 1. Since we're looking where x = 0, sin(-?) = 1. Therefore ? = -?/2.

The figure is a snapshot graph of a sinusoidal wave at t=1.0s.

What is the phase constant of this wave?

Consider the general form
D = Asin(kx – ?)
where A amplitude, k constant, and ? phase
When x = 0, observe D = A.
That means that sin(kx – ?) = 1.
Since we’re looking where x = 0, sin(-?) = 1.
Therefore ? = -?/2.
A and B are in phase, so there is no phase difference.

The figure shows the wave fronts of a circular wave.

What is the phase difference between points A and B?

A and B are in phase, so there is no phase difference.
The phase difference between each concentric wave (wave crest) is 2? rad. Since D is 2 concentric wave crests away from C, the phase difference is 2×2? = 4? rads.

The figure shows the wave fronts of a circular wave.

What is the phase difference between points C and D?

The phase difference between each concentric wave (wave crest) is 2? rad. Since D is 2 concentric wave crests away from C, the phase difference is 2×2? = 4? rads.
Since E is on the trough before the crest F, the phase difference between the two is 1/2 (2?) = ?.

The figure shows the wave fronts of a circular wave.

What is the phase difference between points E and F?

Since E is on the trough before the crest F, the phase difference between the two is 1/2 (2?) = ?.
Rank in order, from largest to smallest, the wavelengths ?a, ?b, and ?c for sound waves having frequencies fa=100Hz, fb=1000Hz, and fc=10,000Hz.

v = ?ƒ ( assume v= 1m/s)

?a = (1/100)
?b = (1/1000)
?c = (1/10000)

So, ?a>?b>?c

A sound wave with wavelength ?? and frequency f? moves into a new medium in which the speed of sound is v?=3.00v?.
If v? = 3.00v?, v?/v? = 3.00. v=?ƒ, so
??ƒ?/??ƒ? = 3.00. Frequency does not change with the medium. So, ƒ?=ƒ?. That , means the new wavelength ??/?? = 3.00, and the new frequency ƒ?/ƒ? = 1.00.
Sound wave A delivers 2 J of energy in 2 s.
Sound wave B delivers 10 J of energy in 5 s.
Sound wave C delivers 2 mJ of energy in 1 ms.Rank in order, from largest to smallest, the sound powers Pa, Pb, and Pc of these three sound waves.

Energy (J) = Power (W) * Time (s) (E=Pt)

Power (W) = Energy (J) / Time (s)

Pa = 2J/2s = 1W
Pb = 10J/5s = 2W
Pc = 2×10?³ J / 1×10?³ s = 2W

So, Pb=Pc>Pa

v = ?ƒ From the graph, v = 4.0 m/s. T = 1/ƒ, so ƒ=1/T. T = 0.25s - 0.05s = 0.2s ƒ = 1/0.2s = 5 Hz v = ?ƒ, so ? = v/ƒ. ? = 4.0 m/s / 5 Hz = 0.8m

The figure is a history graph at x=0m of a wave traveling in the positive x-direction at 4.0 m/s.

What is the wavelength?

v = ?ƒ
From the graph, v = 4.0 m/s.T = 1/ƒ, so ƒ=1/T. T = 0.25s – 0.05s = 0.2s

ƒ = 1/0.2s = 5 Hz

v = ?ƒ, so ? = v/ƒ.

? = 4.0 m/s / 5 Hz = 0.8m

m = 2 The air molecules are moving horizontally.

The figure shows the displacement of a standing sound wave in a 32-cm-long horizontal tube of air open at both ends.

What mode (m-value) is this?

Are the air molecules moving horizontally or vertically?

m = 2

The air molecules are moving horizontally.

m = 4 When frequency is changed to 6ƒ?, there will be 24 antinodes. (6*4)

The figure shows a standing wave oscillating on a string at frequency f0.

What mode (m-value) is this?

How many antinodes will there be if the frequency is increased to 6f0?

m = 4

When frequency is changed to 6ƒ?, there will be 24 antinodes. (6*4)

The air pressure oscillates with maximum amplitude at the anti-nodes. l= 8,24 cm.

The figure shows the displacement of a standing sound wave in a 32-cm-long horizontal tube of air open at both ends.

At what distances from the left end of the tube does the air pressure oscillate with maximum amplitude?

The air pressure oscillates with maximum amplitude at the anti-nodes.
l= 8,24 cm.
The molecules oscillate with maximum amplitude at the nodes. l=0,16,32 cm.

The figure shows the displacement of a standing sound wave in a 32-cm-long horizontal tube of air open at both ends.

At what distances from the left end of the tube do the molecules oscillate with maximum amplitude?

The molecules oscillate with maximum amplitude at the nodes. l=0,16,32 cm.

An organ pipe is tuned to exactly 384 Hz when the room temperature is 20?C.

If the room temperature later increases to 22 ?C, does the pipe’s frequency increase, decrease, or stay the same?

The frequency will increase.

In music, two notes are said to be an octave apart when one note is exactly twice the frequency of the other. Suppose you have a guitar string playing frequency f0.

To increase the frequency by 1 octave(s), to 2f0, by what factor would you have to increase the tension?

ƒ = (1/2L) × ?(T/µ)

2ƒ = (1/2L) × 2?(T/µ)
2ƒ = (1/2L) × ?(2²T/µ)
2ƒ = (1/2L) × ?(4T/µ)

To increase the frequency by 1 octave(s), to 2f0, you would increase the tension by a factor of 4.

In music, two notes are said to be an octave apart when one note is exactly twice the frequency of the other. Suppose you have a guitar string playing frequency f0.

To increase the frequency by 1 octave(s), to 2f0, by what factor would you have to decrease the length?

ƒ = (1/2L) × ?(T/µ)

2ƒ = 2(1/2L) × ?(T/µ)

You would decrease the length by a factor of 2.

A and C = Constructive Interference B = Destructive Interference

The figure shows the circular waves emitted by two in-phase sources.

Are points a, b, and c points of maximum constructive interference or perfect destructive interference?

READ:  Architecture and Urbanism in Renaissance Italy
A and C = Constructive Interference
B = Destructive Interference
I=V/R<br />
Ic<Ia=Id<Ib
Rank the currents from largest to smallest.
I=V/R
Ic;Ia=Id;Ib
?V?? = 3V
What is the potential difference ?V12 between points 1 and 2?
?V?? = 3V
R?

The circuit of the figure(Figure 1) has two resistors, with R1;R2.

Which of the two resistors dissipates the larger amount of power?

R?
R?

The circuit of the figure(Figure 1) has two resistors, with R1;R2.

Which of the two resistors dissipates the larger amount of power?

R?

P=?V²/R</p>
<p>Pc>Pd>Pa>Pb

Rank in order, from largest to smallest, the powers Pa to Pd dissipated by the four resistors in the figure.

P=?V²/R

Pc;Pd;Pa;Pb

A battery with internal resistance r is connected to a load resistance R.

If R is increased, does the terminal voltage of the battery increase, decrease, or stay the same?

Increase
Brighter, Goes out

Initially bulbs A and B in the figure(Figure 1) are glowing.

What happens to bulb A if the switch is closed? Does it get brighter, stay the same, get dimmer, or go out?

What happens to bulb B if the switch is closed? Does it get brighter, stay the same, get dimmer, or go out?

Brighter, Goes out
A is brighter than C and B. C and B are the same brightness.

Bulbs A, B, and C in the figure(Figure 1) are identical, and all are glowing.

Rank in order, from most to least, the brightnesses of the three bulbs.

A is brighter than C and B.
C and B are the same brightness.
Bulb A gets brighter.
Suppose a wire is connected between points 1 and 2. What happens to bulb A? Does it get brighter, stay the same, get dimmer, or go out?
Bulb A gets brighter.
Bulb B goes out.
Suppose a wire is connected between points 1 and 2. What happens to bulb B? Does it get brighter, stay the same, get dimmer, or go out?
Bulb B goes out.
Bulb C goes out.
Suppose a wire is connected between points 1 and 2. What happens to bulb C? Does it get brighter, stay the same, get dimmer, or go out?
Bulb C goes out.
The potential difference ?V?? INCREASES.

Bulbs A and B in the figure(Figure 1) are identical, and both are glowing. Bulb B is removed from its socket.

Does the potential difference ?V12 between points 1 and 2 increase, stay the same, decrease, or become zero?

The potential difference ?V?? INCREASES.
The brightness in Bulb A stays the same.

Bulbs A and B in the figure(Figure 1) are identical, and both are glowing.

What happens to bulb A when the switch is closed? Does its brightness increase, stay the same, decrease, or go out?

The brightness in Bulb A stays the same.
The brightness stays the same in bulb B

Bulbs A and B in the figure(Figure 1) are identical, and both are glowing.

What happens to bulb B when the switch is closed? Does its brightness increase, stay the same, decrease, or go out?

The brightness stays the same in bulb B
The steeper the slope of the tangent, the lower the resistance... so R?>R?>R?

The figure(Figure 1) shows the voltage as a function of time of a capacitor as it is discharged (separately) through three different resistors.

Rank in order, from largest to smallest, the values of the resistances R1 toR3

The steeper the slope of the tangent, the lower the resistance… so R?;R?;R?
Can an insulator be charged?
Yes
Can a conductor be charged?
Yes
Both the spheres and the rod are neutral.

The two oppositely charged metal spheres in the figure have equal quantities of charge. They are brought into contact with a neutral metal rod.

What is the final charge state of each sphere and of the rod?

Both the spheres and the rod are neutral.

Metal sphere A in the figure has 4 units of negative charge and metal sphere B has 2 units of positive charge. The two spheres are brought into contact.

What is the final charge state of each sphere?

The charges will be evenly distributed
qA = -1
qB = -1
A is negative

Metal spheres A and B in the figure are initially neutral and are touching. A positively charged rod is brought near A, but not touching.

Is A now positive, negative, or neutral?

A is negative
Your finger is polarized. Positive charges are on the tip of your finger.

If you bring your finger near a lightweight, negatively charged hanging ball, the ball swings over toward your finger as shown in the figure.

Explain this.

Your finger is polarized. Positive charges are on the tip of your finger.
4F on B 4F on A

Charges A and B in the figure are equal. Each charge exerts a force on the other of magnitude F. Suppose the charge of B is increased by a factor of 4, but everything else is unchanged.

In terms of F, what is the magnitude of the force on A?

In terms of F, what is the magnitude of the force on B?

4F on B
4F on A
The electric field strength at one point near a point charge is 3000 N/C .
What is the field strength if the distance from the point charge is doubled?
What is the field strength if the distance from the point charge is halved?
Doubled – 750 N/C
Halved – 12000 N/C

The electric force on a charged particle in an electric field is F.

What will be the force if the particle’s charge is tripled and the electric field strength is halved?

3F/2
Four lightweight balls A, B, C, and D are suspended by threads. Ball A has been touched by a plastic rod that was rubbed with wool. When the balls are brought close together, without touching, the following observations are made:
Balls B, C, and D are attracted to ball A.
Balls B and D have no effect on each other.
Ball B is attracted to ball C.

What are the charge states (glass, plastic, or neutral) of balls A, B, C, and D?

A – Plastic
B – Neutral
C – Glass
D – Neutral

E?=E?>E?>E?
Rank in order, from largest to smallest, the electric field strengths E1 to E4 at points 1 to 4 in the figure.
E?=E?>E?>E?
?f/?i = 3

A small segment of wire in the figure(Figure 1) contains 13 nC of charge.

The segment is shrunk to one-third of its original length. What is the ratio ?f/?i, where ?i and ?f are the initial and final linear charge densities?

?f/?i = 3
Ff/Fi = 1

A small segment of wire in the figure(Figure 1) contains 13 nC of charge.

A proton is very far from the wire. What is the ratio Ff/Fi of the electric force on the proton after the segment is shrunk to the force before the segment was shrunk?

Ff/Fi = 1
?q = 180 nC

A small segment of wire in the figure(Figure 1) contains 13 nC of charge.

Suppose the original segment of wire is stretched to 15 times its original length. How much charge must be added to the wire to keep the linear charge density unchanged?

?q = 180 nC
0 N/C

The hollow soda straw in the figure(Figure 1) is uniformly charged.

What is the electric field at the center (inside) of the straw?

0 N/C

An electron experiences a force of magnitude F when it is 2 cm from a very long, charged wire with linear charge density ?.

If the charge density is doubled, at what distance from the wire will a proton experience a force of the same magnitude F?

4cm
?f/?i = 10 Ff/Fi = 1

The irregularly shaped area of charge in the figure(Figure 1) has surface charge density ?i. Each dimension (x and y) of the area is reduced by a factor of 3.163.

What is the ratio ?f/?i, where ?f is the final surface charge density?

An electron is very far from the area. What is the ratio Ff/Fi of the electric force on the electron after the area is reduced to the force before the area was reduced?

?f/?i = 10

Ff/Fi = 1

READ:  Ophelia Character Sketch

A circular disk has surface charge density 20 nC/cm^2 .

What will the surface charge density be if the radius of the disk is doubled?

5.0 nC/cm²

A sphere of radius R has charge Q. The electric field strength at distance r>R is Ei.

What is the ratio Ef/Ei of the final to initial electric field strengths if Q is halved?

Ef/Ei = 1/2

A sphere of radius R has charge Q. The electric field strength at distance r>R is Ei.

What is the ratio Ef/Ei of the final to initial electric field strengths if R is halved?

Ef/Ei = 1

A sphere of radius R has charge Q. The electric field strength at distance r>R is Ei.

What is the ratio Ef/Ei of the final to initial electric field strengths if r is halved (but is still >R)?

Ef/Ei = 4
If the ball is discharged, the period will INCREASE.

The ball in the figure(Figure 1) is suspended from a large, uniformly charged positive plate. It swings with period T.

If the ball is discharged, will the period increase, decrease, or stay the same?

If the ball is discharged, the period will INCREASE.
E?=E?=E?=E?=E?
Rank in order, from largest to smallest, the electric field strengths E1 to E5 at the five points in the figure(Figure 1) .
E?=E?=E?=E?=E?

A parallel-plate capacitor consists of two square plates, size L×L, separated by distance d. The plates are given charge ±Q.

What is the ratio Ef/Ei of the final to initial electric field strengths if Q is doubled?

Ef/Ei=2

A parallel-plate capacitor consists of two square plates, size L×L, separated by distance d. The plates are given charge ±Q.

What is the ratio Ef/Ei of the final to initial electric field strengths if L is doubled?

Ef/Ei = 1/4

A parallel-plate capacitor consists of two square plates, size L×L, separated by distance d. The plates are given charge ±Q.

What is the ratio Ef/Ei of the final to initial electric field strengths if d is doubled?

Ef/Ei = 1
Positive - Accelerates to the right. Neutral - Remains in Place Negative - Accelerates to the left

A small object is released in the center of the capacitor in the figure(Figure 1) . For each situation, does the object move to the right, to the left, or remain in place? If it moves, does it accelerate or move at constant speed?

A positive object is released from rest.

A neutral but polarizable object is released from rest.

A negative object is released from rest.

Positive – Accelerates to the right.

Neutral – Remains in Place

Negative – Accelerates to the left

A proton and an electron are released from rest in the center of a capacitor.

Is the force ratio Fp/Fe greater than 1, less than 1, or equal to 1?

Is the acceleration ratio ap/ae greater than 1, less than 1, or equal to 1?

Fp/Fe = 1

ap/ae <1

A - 6 B - 9

Two pairs of charges are shown in (Figure 1)

At which point or points is the electric field zero in figure (a)?

At which point or points is the electric field zero in figure (b)?

A – 6

B – 9

(A) No net charge (B) Net positive Charge (C) Net negative charge

The figure(Figure 1) shows cross sections of three-dimensional closed surfaces. They have a flat top and bottom surface above and below the plane of the page. However, the electric field is everywhere parallel to the page, so there is no flux through the top or bottom surface. The electric field is uniform over each face of the surface

For each figure, does the surface enclose a net positive charge, a net negative charge, or no net charge?

(A) No net charge
(B) Net positive Charge
(C) Net negative charge
?square>?circle

The square and circle in the figure(Figure 1) are in the same uniform field. The diameter of the circle equals the edge length of the square.

Is ?square larger than, smaller than, or equal to ?circle?

?square>?circle
|?1|=|?2|
In the figure(Figure 1) is ?1 larger than, smaller than, or equal to ?2?
|?1|=|?2|
(a) = 1 (b) = -1 (c) = 0
What is the electric flux through each of the surfaces in the figure(Figure 1) ? Give each answer as a multiple of q?0.
(a) = 1
(b) = -1
(c) = 0
A = 4 B = -4 C= 0 D = 3 E=0
What is the electric flux through each surface in the figure(Figure 1) ? Give the answer as a multiple of q?0.
A = 4
B = -4
C= 0
D = 3
E=0
Does the electric field strength at each point increase, decrease, or stay the same? 1 stays the same 2 decreases 3 stays the same
The charged balloon in the figure(Figure 1) expands as it is blown up, increasing in size from the initial to final diameters shown.

Does the electric field strength at each point increase, decrease, or stay the same?

1 stays the same
2 decreases
3 stays the same

Student 1 - they are equal because they enclose equal charges.
The two spheres in the figure(Figure 1) surround equal charges. Three students are discussing the situation.
Student 1: The fluxes through spheres A and B are equal because they enclose equal charges.
Student 2: But the electric field on sphere B is weaker than the electric field on sphere A. The flux depends on the electric field strength, so the flux through A is larger than the flux through B.
Student 3: I thought we learned that flux was about surface area. Sphere B is larger than sphere A, so I think the flux through B is larger than the flux through A.
Student 1 – they are equal because they enclose equal charges.
The sphere and ellipsoid in the figure(Figure 1) surround equal charges. Four students are discussing the situation.
Student 1: The fluxes through A and B are equal because the average radius is the same.
Student 2: I agree that the fluxes are equal, but that’s because they enclose equal charges.
Student 3: The electric field is not perpendicular to the surface for B, and that makes the flux through B less than the flux through A.
Student 4: I don’t think that Gauss’s law even applies to a situation like B, so we can’t compare the fluxes through A and .B
The fluxes are equal because they enclose equal charges Student 2
positive negative positive

A small, metal sphere hangs by an insulating thread within the larger, hollow conducting sphere of the figure (Figure 1) . A conducting wire extends from the small sphere through, but not touching, a small hole in the hollow sphere. A charged rod is used to transfer positive charge to the protruding wire. After the charged rod has touched the wire and been removed, are the following surfaces positive, negative, or not charged?

The small sphere
the inner surface of the hollow sphere
the outer surface of the hollow sphere

positive
negative
positive

An electron moves along the trajectory of the figure from i to f.

Does the electric potential energy increase, decrease, or stay the same?

Is the electron’s speed at f greater than, less than, or equal to its speed at i?

The electric potential energy will increase
the speed at f is less than the speed at i
Ua>Uc>Ue=Uf>Ub>Ud
Rank in order, from most positive to most negative, the potential energies Ua to Uf of the six electric dipoles in the uniform electric field of the figure.
Ua;Uc;Ue=Uf;Ub;Ud

A capacitor with plates separated by distance d is charged to a potential difference ?VC. All wires and batteries are disconnected, then the two plates are pulled apart (with insulated handles) to a new separation of distance 2d.

Does the capacitor charge Q change as the separation increases?

Does the electric field strength E change as the separation increases?

Does the electric field strength E change as the separation increases

no
no
yes – by a factor of 2
Va=Vb>Vc>Ve=Vd
Rank in order, from largest to smallest, the electric potentials Va to Ve at points a to e in the figure
Va=Vb;Vc;Ve=Vd

icon
Sara from Artscolumbia

Hi there, would you like to get such an essay? How about receiving a customized one?
Check it out goo.gl/Crty7Tt

PHYS 2212K - Final Exam Practice
Artscolumbia
Artscolumbia
They all have the same wave speed because the m/L ratio for each rope is the same. va=vb=vc.
Rank in order, from
2018-10-20 00:42:57
PHYS 2212K - Final Exam Practice
$ 13.900 2018-12-31
artscolumbia.org
In stock
Rated /5 based on customer reviews