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Artscolumbia / Visual arts  / Painting

Venetian School: Titian

Titian (1477-1576) is the last of the quartet of the world’s painters; and as a painter pure and simple, in the matter of presenting nature, in his mastery of color, in his sure, strong brushwork, in his ability to keep a composition a unit, in fact, in all those things that go to make a purely pictorial effect, he probably stands at the head of them all. It is the dignity and grandeur of human existence that Titian presents to us. In Correggio was the life and joy and vivacity of nature; in Titian the grand, the magnificent, the sublimely sensuous. He builds «p masses and spaces and forms in his pictures that have the grandeur and power of nlountain...

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Venetian school: Giorgione

The Venetian School, which added the last great element—color—to Italian art, continued the impulse of the High Renaissance longer than did the other schools. Decadence set in less rapidly with them, and the last really great masters were Venetians. The art motive of Correggio was also that of the Venetians. With them it was truly art for art’s sake in the highest meaning of the word. Although a sensuous art, it was noble, stately and dignified. Nature to the Venetians rang with symphonic harmonies, and although the grandeur of line of the Florentines was not theirs, they built up vast and grand color harmonies that hold one with the power of a mighty orchestra. It is the Venetian love of...

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Milanese and Siennese school

Giulio Romano (1492-1546) was the strongest of Raphael’s pupils, and became the real founder of the Roman School, which directly influenced the painting of the Decadence. As long as he was under Raphael’s influence he painted so closely in his style that in many instances his work is almost like his master’s; but after Raphael's death he struck out for himself, and in his hands the refined strength and power of Raphael be- came exaggerated coarseness. He was a good draughtsman, but his forms are heavy and entirely lack the grace of Raphael. His color was dead and of a bricky tone, due, it is said, to his having been employed so much by Raphael for the dead-coloring of his pictures....

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The High Renaissance in Italy: painting

[caption id="attachment_6621" align="aligncenter" width="580"] CREATION OF MAN. MICHELANGELO[/caption] Florentine and Roman Schools: Da Vinci The art of a nation passes through very much the same development as that of an individual. There are the first crude efforts, and then the struggle with technical difficulties. The delirious pleasure of over coming the latter, then, very often makes one forget the end for the means, and one falls in love with the language itself rather than with the things to be expressed. Ever increasing power of observation and per ception also captivates, and the result is often mere transcription from nature. There is, however, in this stage a certain naive unconsciousness, a simplicity of thought, which is often lost in the maturity of effort....

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Madonna and Child Bramantino: The Falls of the Rhine

[caption id="attachment_6604" align="alignleft" width="266"] Madonna and Child Attributed to Bartolommeo Suardi, called Bramantino (about 1460 to about 1536)[/caption] A single picture acquired in 191 3 is anterior to the nineteenth century. It is a Madonna attributed to Bartolommeo Suardi, whose intimacy with Bramante and whose care to follow Bramante’s second manner gave him the surname of “ Bramantino," the ‘‘little Bramante." The Milanese School developed late, playing but a small part in the early Italian Renaissance. Nevertheless, it rapidly acquired distinction and exercised an influence upon French and Flemish artists almost as important as that of the Florentine School. The Museum of Fine Arts has possessed hitherto of this school only the “ Portrait of a Man,” by Andrea da Solario, acquired in...

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An Italian portrait of the Lombard school

A recent ccession of the Museum is a XVI century Italian portrait of the Lombard school, ascribed with a high degree of plausibility to the painter Gianpietrino ( Pietro Rizzo or Ricci), who flourished at Milan during the latter part of the XV century and the opening years of the XVI century. He was not only an imitator of the style of Leonardo da Vinci ; but was, with Boltraffio, Marco d'Oggionno, Salaino, Giovan Antonio Bazzi and Cassare da Sesto, a direct pupil of the master. The gentle smiling countenances of Gianpietrino's female heads are immediately recognized as reproductions of Leonardo's enigmatic smile as typified in the Mona Lisa. Of all the members of the Lombard school, Gianpietrino was perhaps...

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Sale of Mr. Woodburn’s Pictures

The late Mr. Woodburn was well known as a collector of paintings, and often employed in that capacity, both by English noblemen and gentlemen, and by the government. His collection of pictures, including works of the Italian, Flemish, Dutch, and German schools, was recently put up for sale by public auction. As might be expected from the position he occupied, many of them are productions of a high order, and the large sums for which they were sold showed the estimation in which they are held by connoisseurs. Of the Italian school, three were described as Rafiaelles, several as specimens of Leonardo da Vinci, and one as the work of Buonarotti. Doubts have been expressed as to the authenticity of...

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Memoirs of the Early Italian Painters by null Jameson

The first of these volumes comprises a selection from Mrs. Jameson's miscellaneous writings, and includes several of the best known and most pleasing of her minor productions. Among them are the three essays on The House of Titian, Washington Allston, and Adelaide Kemble, which were first published twelve or fifteen years ago, and were re printed, with other papers, in one of the volumes of Wiley and Putnam's Library of Choice Reading. There are also in the volume now on our table several short and characteristic tales, showing the versatility of Mrs. Jameson's powers, and a series of brief and suggestive Studies, chiefly on topics connected with German literature, taken from the Journal of her residence in Canada, published in...

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Early Italian Paintings: In the Metropolitan Museum of Art

AST autumn an interesting collection of Early Italian Paintings was lent by Mrs. L. F. Holden, of Ohio, to the Metropolitan Museum of Art. After be ing shown for some time as a special ex hibit the collection has been distributed, the several paintings being placed accord ing to their schools and epochs in the various galleries. Of this collection Mr. Bryson-Bur roughs, in the Bulletin of the Metropolitan Museum, has said: "Mrs. Holden's is an important col lection. In it are many pictures which, owing to the uncertainty of their-author ship and schools and the archeological points which they exemplify, appeal strongly to the prevailing taste for con noisseurship. There are paintings, also, of great rarity and beauty and some which...

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The Alleged Theft of the Mona Lisa

The story that the Mona Lisa has been stolen from the Louvre and a copy substituted in its place, is one of the most sensational which, so far as art matters are concerned, has ever made its way into print. If the Mona Lisa had been cut from its frame, and the astounded attendants at the museum had been con fronted with an empty space where the wonderful picture used to hang, it would have been not more incredible than some things of the kind that have happened. Everyone will remember the theft of the celebrated portrait of the Duchess of Devonshire, painted by Gainsborough. But this Mona Lisa story sounds extremely improbable. It emanates from a single Paris newspaper, and...

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