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Monologues for women

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Agamemnon Essay

A monologue from the play by Aeschylus NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramas of Aeschylus. Trans. Anna Swanwick. London: George Bell and Sons, 1907. CLYTEMNESTRA: Though much to suit the times before was said,It shames me not the opposite to speak:For, plotting against foes,–our seeming friends,–How else contrive with Ruin’s wily snare,Too high…

Achilles Vs Agamemnon Essay

A monologue from the play by Seneca NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Seneca’s Tragedy, v. ii. Trans. Frank Justus Miller. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1917. CASSANDRA: Where am I? Fled is the kindly light, deep darkness blinds my eyes, and the sky, buried in gloom, is hidden away. But see! with double sun…

The Tragic Hero In Antigone Essay

A monologue from the play by Sophocles NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Greek Dramas. Ed. Bernadotte Perrin. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1904. ANTIGONE: Tomb, bridal chamber, eternal prison in the caverned rock, whither I go to find mine own, those many who have perished, and whom Persephone hath received among the dead!…

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As You Like It Character Change Essay

A monologue from the play by William Shakespeare PHEBE: I would not by thy executioner.I fly thee, for I would not injure thee.Thou tell’st me there is murder in mine eye:‘Tis pretty, sure, and very probableThat eyes, that are the frail’st and softest things,Who shut their coward gates on atomies,Should be called tyrants, butchers, murderers.Now…

Critical Essay As You Like It

A monologue from the play by William Shakespeare PHEBE: Think not I love him, though I ask for him;‘Tis but a peevish boy; yet he talks well.But what care I for words? Yet words do wellWhen he that speaks them pleases those that hear.It is a pretty youth; not very pretty;But sure he’s proud; and…

ATHALIAH Essay

A monologue from the play by Jean Racine NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramatic Works of Jean Racine. Trans. Robert Bruce Boswell. London: George Bell and Sons, 1911. ATHALIAH: While thus disturb’d, before me roseThe vision of a boy in shining robe,Such as the Hebrew priests are wont to wear.My drooping spirits at…

BEWARE OF SMOOTH WATER Essay

A monologue from the play by Pedro Calderon de la Barca NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Eight Dramas of Calderon. Trans. Edward Fitzgerald. London: Macmillan & Co., 1906. DONNA CLARA: Not to spareYour father even, Eugenia! For shame!‘Tis time to tie your roving tongue indeed.Consider, too, we are not in the country,Where tongue and…

Morehead Cain Essay Prompt

A monologue from the play by Lord Byron NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Lord Byron: Six Plays. Lord Byron. Los Angeles: Black Box Press, 2007. ADAH: ‘Twere better that he never had been born?Oh, do not say so! Where were then the joys,The mother’s joys of watching, nourishing,And loving him? Soft! he awakes. Sweet…

Abel And Cain Essay

A monologue from the play by Lord Byron NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Lord Byron: Six Plays. Lord Byron. Los Angeles: Black Box Press, 2007. EVE: Hear, Jehovah!May the eternal Serpent’s curse be on him!For he was fitter for his seed than ours.May all his days be desolate!He hath left thee no brother, Adah—Zillah…

The Casket Comedy Essay Research Paper

A monologue from the play by Titus Maccius Plautus NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Plautus, vol. II. Trans. Paul Nixon. London: William Heinemann, 1917. HALISCA: If heaven doesn’t rescue me, I’m dead and done for, with not a soul to look to for aid! Oh, how miserable my own heedlessness makes me! Oh! how…

Choephori Or The Libation Bearers Essay Paper

A monologue from the play by Aeschylus NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramas of Aeschylus. Trans. Anna Swanwick. London: George Bell and Sons, 1907. NURSE: My mistress bade me summon with all speedÆgisthos to the strangers, that he mayMore clearly learn, as man from man, this taleNewly announced. Before the menial train,She, at…

Choephori Or The Libation Bearers Essay

A monologue from the play by Aeschylus NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramas of Aeschylus. Trans. Anna Swanwick. London: George Bell and Sons, 1907. ELECTRA: Ye captive women, ye who tend this home,Since ye are present to escort with meThese lustral rites, your counsel now I crave.How, while I pour these off’rings on…

The Cid Essay Paper

A monologue from the play by Pierre Corneille NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Cid. Trans. Roscoe Mongan. New York: Hinds & Noble, 1896. INFANTA: Do I remember whose daughter I am? Of course. I remember it so well, that I would shed my blood rather than degrade my rank. I might assuredly answer…

Adriana The Comedy Of Errors monologue Essay

A monologue from the play by William Shakespeare ADRIANA: Ay, ay, Antipholus, look strange and frown. Some other mistress hath thy sweet aspects; I am not Adriana, nor thy wife. The time was once when thou unurged wouldst vow That never words were music to thine ear, That never object pleasing in thine eye, That…

Coriolanus Essay Volumnia

A monologue from the play by William Shakespeare VOLUMNIA: You are too absolute;Though therein you can never be too noble,But when extremities speak. I have heard you say,Honor and policy, like unsevered friends,I’ th’ war do grow together. Grant that, and tell me,In peace what each of them by th’ other lose,That they combine not…

Coriolanus Essay Prompts

A monologue from the play by William Shakespeare VOLUMNIA: O, no more, no more!You have said you will not grant us anything;For we have nothing else to ask but thatWhich you deny already; yet we will ask,That, if you fail in our request, the blameMay hang upon your hardness. Think with thyselfHow more unfortunate than…

THE ECCLESIAZUS? Essay

A monologue from the play by Aristophanes NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Aristophanes: The Eleven Comedies. Trans. Anonymous. London: The Athenian Society, 1922. PRAXAGORA: My country is as dear to me as it is to you, and I groan, I am grieved at all that is happening in it. Scarcely one in ten of…

EUMENIDES Essay

A monologue from the play by Aeschylus NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramas of Aeschylus. Trans. Anna Swanwick. London: George Bell and Sons, 1907. ATHENA: Not slighted are ye, powers august! through rageCurse not with hopeless blight the abode of man.I too on Zeus rely; why speak of that?And sole among the gods…

Faust Essay

A monologue from the play by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Faust. Trans. Bayard Taylor. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1898. MARGARET: Thou wilt unloose my chain,And in thy lap wilt take me once again.How comes it that thou dost not shrink from me?–Say, dost thou know, my friend, whom thou mak’st…

Heaven And Earth Discussion Essay

A monologue from the play by Lord Byron NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Lord Byron: Six Plays. Lord Byron. Los Angeles: Black Box Press, 2007. AHOLIBAMAH: Samiasa!Wheresoe’erThou rulest in the upper air—Or warring with the spirits who may dareDispute with himWho made all empires, empire; or recallingSome wandering star, which shoots through the abyss,Whose…

Heaven And Earth Analysis Essay

A monologue from the play by Lord Byron NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Lord Byron: Six Plays. Lord Byron. Los Angeles: Black Box Press, 2007. AHOLIBAMAH: Let them fly!I hear the voice which says that all must die,Sooner than our white-bearded patriarchs died;And that on highAn ocean is prepared,While from belowThe deep shall rise…

HECUBA Essay

A monologue from the play by Euripides NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Plays of Euripides in English, vol. i. Trans. Shelley Dean Milman. London: J.M. Dent & Sons, 1920. HECUBA: Not oneExists, whose sorrows equal mine, unlessYou of Calamity herself would speak.Yet hear the motive why I clasp your knees.If I appear to…

The Legacy Of Helen Essay

A monologue from the play by Euripides NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Plays of Euripides in English, vol. i. Trans. Shelley Dean Milman. London: J.M. Dent & Sons, 1920. HELEN: To what illsHave I been subject, O my dear companions!Did not my mother, as a prodigyWhich wondering mortals gaze at, bring me forth?For…

Helen Essay Thesis

A monologue from the play by Euripides NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Plays of Euripides in English, vol. i. Trans. Shelley Dean Milman. London: J.M. Dent & Sons, 1920. HELEN: At thy knees I fall,O virgin, as a suppliant, and here takeMy miserable seat, both for myself,And him whom, scarce restored to me,…

Shakespeare Henry Iv Essay

A monologue from the play by William Shakespeare LADY PERCY: O my good lord, why are you thus alone?For what offense have I this fortnight beenA banished woman from my Harry’s bed?Tell me, sweet lord, what is’t that takes from theeThy stomach, pleasure, and thy golden sleep?Why dost thou bend thine eyes upon the earth,And…

Shakespeare Play Henry Viii Essay

A monologue from the play by William Shakespeare KATHERINE: Sir, I desire you do me right and justice,And to bestow your pity on me; forI am a most poor woman and a stranger,Born out of your dominions: having hereNo judge indifferent, nor no more assuranceOf equal friendship and proceeding. Alas, sir,In what have I offended…

Euripides Hippolytus Essay

A monologue from the play by Euripides NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Plays of Euripides in English, vol. ii. Trans. Shelley Dean Milman. London: J.M. Dent & Sons, 1922. NURSE: O queen, at first, an instantaneous shock,I, from the history of thy woes, received:Now am I sensible my fears were groundless.But frequently the…

THE IMPOSTURES OF SCAPIN Essay

A monologue from the play by Moliere NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramatic Works of Moliere, Vol. III. Ed. Charles Heron Wall. London: George Bell & Sons, 1891. ZERBINETTE: I shall not risk much by telling you this story, for it is an adventure which is not likely to remain secret long. Fate…

IPHIGENIA Essay

A monologue from the play by Jean Racine NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramatic Works of Jean Racine. Trans. Robert Bruce Boswell. London: George Bell and Sons, 1911. CLYTEMNESTRA: Fit offspring of a fatal stock!Thine is the blood of Atreus and Thyestes:Thy daughter’s murderer; there but remainsOne horror more, to serve her as…

IPHIGENIA IN AULIS Essay Summary

A monologue from the play by Euripides NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Plays of Euripides in English, vol. i. Trans. Shelley Dean Milman. London: J.M. Dent & Sons, 1920. CLYTEMNESTRA: Now hear me, for my thoughts will I unfoldIn no obscure and coloured mode of speech.First then, for first with this will I…

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Type of monologues for women is a form of speech formed as a result of active speech activity, is intended for passive and indirect perception, and practically is not connected with the speech of the interlocutor either in the content or the structural sense. In some cases, the past is defined as an in the transpersonal speech act. The monologue is not adapted to direct communication; it assumes that the listener only listens, but does not answer.

Contemporary monologues for women are pronounced aloud and addressed to a real or imaginary interlocutor speech, in which the most secret thoughts are transmitted. The speaker’s emotions are expressed. Speech situation is based on the principle of speaker-listener. The monologue is pronounced by one person and does not involve a response from other participants in speech communication directly in the language process.

Monologues can be of various types, depending on the sense they render. Comedic monologues for women are in the humoristic direction. Their sense is usually concentrated around the funny situation. They are used as a mean of entertainment for the audience. Best monologues for women are traced in history as well as in the books and most popular films. These monologues are logically built and enhanced with the variety of speech means.

Topics for the monologues should be wide and related to the contemporary reality. In this case, the audience feels like the speaker is trying to deliver a relevant message, that is connected to the current events. If the text of the speech will be enhanced with the variety of stylistic means, the guarantee that listeners or readers will perceive it is 100%. On the stage a role, containing the scene was, it is necessary to deliver a message to the audience is considered to be the best. It allows the actor to demonstrate his talent and skills to the fullest.

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