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Monologues for women

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AGAMEMNON Essay

A monologue from the play by Aeschylus NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramas of Aeschylus. Trans. Anna Swanwick. London: George Bell and Sons, 1907. CLYTEMNESTRA: Men of our city, Argive elders here,I shame not in your presence to avowMy wifely temper; bashful Fear in timeFrom mortals dieth: not by others taught,But from myself,…

AGAMEMNON Essay

A monologue from the play by Aeschylus NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramas of Aeschylus. Trans. Anna Swanwick. London: George Bell and Sons, 1907. CLYTEMNESTRA: Though much to suit the times before was said,It shames me not the opposite to speak:For, plotting against foes,–our seeming friends,–How else contrive with Ruin’s wily snare,Too high…

AGAMEMNON Essay

A monologue from the play by Seneca NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Seneca’s Tragedy, v. ii. Trans. Frank Justus Miller. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1917. CASSANDRA: Where am I? Fled is the kindly light, deep darkness blinds my eyes, and the sky, buried in gloom, is hidden away. But see! with double sun…

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AJAX Essay

A monologue from the play by Sophocles NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Dramas. Sophocles. London: J.M. Dent & Sons, 1906. TECMESSA: You shall hear all that passed,Being sharers in the event. At dead of night,When the evening campfires no longer blazed,He grasped his two-edged weapon, and seemed bentTo sally upon some errand, objectless.I, in…

AJAX Essay

A monologue from the play by Sophocles NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Dramas. Sophocles. London: J.M. Dent & Sons, 1906. TECMESSA: O my lord Ajax, in the ills of menThere is none sorer than Necessity.I was the offspring of a sire free-born,Strong in his wealth, no Phrygian more than he;And now, I am a…

ALL’S WELL THAT ENDS WELL Essay

A monologue from the play by William Shakespeare HELENA: I confessHere on my knee before high heaven and you,That before you, and next unto high heaven,I love your son.My friends were poor but honest; so’s my love.Be not offended, for it hurts not himThat he is loved of me. I follow him notBy any token…

ANTIGONE Essay

A monologue from the play by Sophocles NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Greek Dramas. Ed. Bernadotte Perrin. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1904. ANTIGONE: Tomb, bridal chamber, eternal prison in the caverned rock, whither I go to find mine own, those many who have perished, and whom Persephone hath received among the dead!…

AS YOU LIKE IT Essay

A monologue from the play by William Shakespeare PHEBE: I would not by thy executioner.I fly thee, for I would not injure thee.Thou tell’st me there is murder in mine eye:‘Tis pretty, sure, and very probableThat eyes, that are the frail’st and softest things,Who shut their coward gates on atomies,Should be called tyrants, butchers, murderers.Now…

AS YOU LIKE IT Essay

A monologue from the play by William Shakespeare PHEBE: Think not I love him, though I ask for him;‘Tis but a peevish boy; yet he talks well.But what care I for words? Yet words do wellWhen he that speaks them pleases those that hear.It is a pretty youth; not very pretty;But sure he’s proud; and…

ATHALIAH Essay

A monologue from the play by Jean Racine NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramatic Works of Jean Racine. Trans. Robert Bruce Boswell. London: George Bell and Sons, 1911. ATHALIAH: While thus disturb’d, before me roseThe vision of a boy in shining robe,Such as the Hebrew priests are wont to wear.My drooping spirits at…

BAJAZET Essay

A monologue from the play by Jean Racine NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramatic Works of Jean Racine. Trans. Robert Bruce Boswell. London: George Bell and Sons, 1911. ROXANA: I know ’tis not the custom of our sultans,Who in their pride stoop not to such constraints,Nor hold the laws of marriage made for…

BEWARE OF SMOOTH WATER Essay

A monologue from the play by Pedro Calderon de la Barca NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Eight Dramas of Calderon. Trans. Edward Fitzgerald. London: Macmillan & Co., 1906. DONNA CLARA: Not to spareYour father even, Eugenia! For shame!‘Tis time to tie your roving tongue indeed.Consider, too, we are not in the country,Where tongue and…

CAIN Essay

A monologue from the play by Lord Byron NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Lord Byron: Six Plays. Lord Byron. Los Angeles: Black Box Press, 2007. ADAH: ‘Twere better that he never had been born?Oh, do not say so! Where were then the joys,The mother’s joys of watching, nourishing,And loving him? Soft! he awakes. Sweet…

CAIN Essay

A monologue from the play by Lord Byron NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Lord Byron: Six Plays. Lord Byron. Los Angeles: Black Box Press, 2007. EVE: Hear, Jehovah!May the eternal Serpent’s curse be on him!For he was fitter for his seed than ours.May all his days be desolate!He hath left thee no brother, Adah—Zillah…

THE CASKET COMEDY Essay

A monologue from the play by Titus Maccius Plautus NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Plautus, vol. II. Trans. Paul Nixon. London: William Heinemann, 1917. HALISCA: If heaven doesn’t rescue me, I’m dead and done for, with not a soul to look to for aid! Oh, how miserable my own heedlessness makes me! Oh! how…

CHOEPHORI or THE LIBATION BEARERS Essay

A monologue from the play by Aeschylus NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramas of Aeschylus. Trans. Anna Swanwick. London: George Bell and Sons, 1907. NURSE: My mistress bade me summon with all speedÆgisthos to the strangers, that he mayMore clearly learn, as man from man, this taleNewly announced. Before the menial train,She, at…

CHOEPHORI or THE LIBATION BEARERS Essay

A monologue from the play by Aeschylus NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramas of Aeschylus. Trans. Anna Swanwick. London: George Bell and Sons, 1907. ELECTRA: Ye captive women, ye who tend this home,Since ye are present to escort with meThese lustral rites, your counsel now I crave.How, while I pour these off’rings on…

THE CID Essay

A monologue from the play by Pierre Corneille NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Cid. Trans. Roscoe Mongan. New York: Hinds & Noble, 1896. INFANTA: Do I remember whose daughter I am? Of course. I remember it so well, that I would shed my blood rather than degrade my rank. I might assuredly answer…

Adriana The Comedy Of Errors monologue Essay

A monologue from the play by William Shakespeare ADRIANA: Ay, ay, Antipholus, look strange and frown. Some other mistress hath thy sweet aspects; I am not Adriana, nor thy wife. The time was once when thou unurged wouldst vow That never words were music to thine ear, That never object pleasing in thine eye, That…

CORIOLANUS Essay

A monologue from the play by William Shakespeare VOLUMNIA: You are too absolute;Though therein you can never be too noble,But when extremities speak. I have heard you say,Honor and policy, like unsevered friends,I’ th’ war do grow together. Grant that, and tell me,In peace what each of them by th’ other lose,That they combine not…

CORIOLANUS Essay

A monologue from the play by William Shakespeare VOLUMNIA: O, no more, no more!You have said you will not grant us anything;For we have nothing else to ask but thatWhich you deny already; yet we will ask,That, if you fail in our request, the blameMay hang upon your hardness. Think with thyselfHow more unfortunate than…

DIALOGUES OF THE GODS Essay

A monologue from the dialogues of Lucian NOTE: This monologue is reprinted with the author’s permission. All inquiries should be directed to the author at: [email protected] APHRODITE: So what’s this I hear, Selene—that you’ve taken to pausing the moon in the sky every night so you can gaze like a schoolgirl at this hunter, Endymion,…

DIALOGUES OF THE GODS Essay

A monologue from the dialogues of Lucian NOTE: This monologue is reprinted with the author’s permission. All inquiries should be directed to the author at: [email protected] HERA: You should be ashamed of yourself! Lord of the gods! Hah! Your behavior wouldn’t be proper even if you were some mortal peasant! You desert me, your lawful…

DIALOGUES OF THE GODS Essay

A monologue from the dialogues of Lucian NOTE: This monologue is reprinted with the author’s permission. All inquiries should be directed to the author at: [email protected] APHRODITE: Child, you must think before you act. It’s bad enough the way you toy with mortals down there—always inciting them to some mischief or another, and always in…

DIDO, QUEEN OF CARTHAGE Essay

A monologue from the play by Christopher Marlowe NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Dido Queen of Carthage. Christopher Marlowe. London: Hurst Robinson, 1825. DIDO: Speaks not ?neas like a conqueror?O blessed tempests that did drive him in!O happy sand that made him run aground!Henceforth you shall be our Carthage gods.Ay, but it may be,…

DIDO, QUEEN OF CARTHAGE Essay

A monologue from the play by Christopher Marlowe NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Dido Queen of Carthage. Christopher Marlowe. London: Hurst Robinson, 1825. DIDO: Are these the sails that, in despite of me,Pack’d with the winds to bear ?neas hence?I’ll hang ye in the chamber where I lie;Drive, if you can, my house to…

THE ECCLESIAZUS? Essay

A monologue from the play by Aristophanes NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Aristophanes: The Eleven Comedies. Trans. Anonymous. London: The Athenian Society, 1922. PRAXAGORA: My country is as dear to me as it is to you, and I groan, I am grieved at all that is happening in it. Scarcely one in ten of…

ELECTRA Essay

A monologue from the play by Euripides NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Plays of Euripides in English, vol. i. Trans. Shelley Dean Milman. London: J.M. Dent & Sons, 1920. ELECTRA: Let me then speak; but where shall I begin.Thy insults to recount? With what conclude?Or how pursue the train of my discourse?I never…

ELECTRA Essay

A monologue from the play by Sophocles NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Dramas. Sophocles. London: J.M. Dent & Sons, 1906. ELECTRA: Well, it is strange that you, being his childWho was your sire, should have regard for her,Your mother, and have quite forgotten him!All this good counsel you bestow on meIs of her teaching;…

ELECTRA Essay

A monologue from the play by Sophocles NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Dramas. Sophocles. London: J.M. Dent & Sons, 1906. ELECTRA: Hear, then, the course I am resolved upon.Friends to stand by us even you must knowThat none are left but us; but the Grave has takenAnd reft them; and we two remain alone.I,…

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Type of monologues for women is a form of speech formed as a result of active speech activity, is intended for passive and indirect perception, and practically is not connected with the speech of the interlocutor either in the content or the structural sense. In some cases, the past is defined as an in the transpersonal speech act. The monologue is not adapted to direct communication; it assumes that the listener only listens, but does not answer.

Contemporary monologues for women are pronounced aloud and addressed to a real or imaginary interlocutor speech, in which the most secret thoughts are transmitted. The speaker’s emotions are expressed. Speech situation is based on the principle of speaker-listener. The monologue is pronounced by one person and does not involve a response from other participants in speech communication directly in the language process.

Monologues can be of various types, depending on the sense they render. Comedic monologues for women are in the humoristic direction. Their sense is usually concentrated around the funny situation. They are used as a mean of entertainment for the audience. Best monologues for women are traced in history as well as in the books and most popular films. These monologues are logically built and enhanced with the variety of speech means.

Topics for the monologues should be wide and related to the contemporary reality. In this case, the audience feels like the speaker is trying to deliver a relevant message, that is connected to the current events. If the text of the speech will be enhanced with the variety of stylistic means, the guarantee that listeners or readers will perceive it is 100%. On the stage a role, containing the scene was, it is necessary to deliver a message to the audience is considered to be the best. It allows the actor to demonstrate his talent and skills to the fullest.

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