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Prose

Franz Kafka, translated by Mark Herman Chicken

Franz Kava's name has been appropriated as our century's reigning adjective; 'Kafkaesque" is a word for which no adequate synonym exists. From the absurd circuitry of managed care to our Deliberateness workplaces and the bizarre comic opera playing in Washington, the relevance of 'The Castle," Kava's Para able of bureaucracy gone mad, has never been lost on the modern reader. Until now, the accepted English version of ' 'The Castle" has been the 1925 translation by Will and Edwin Mir, who believed Kava's unfinished novel was about the quest for an unavailable God, according to Mark Herman, translator of the present volume. Harm's new translation emphasizes modern and post- modern meanings; Herman believes the book is about meaning itself, about the...

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Dickinson and Roe’s nineteenth century english prose – critical essay

This is one of the choicest books of the day for all who love literature, who would intelligently admire and affectionately enjoy the best essayists of England and the one great essayist of America. It is in a class by itself, since in no other volume can be found so much» that is best regarding writers who were best in essay writing. It is a book in which any college student will revel, a book to inspire and guide the thought of a class, and is at the same time a book to fascinate any lover of the essay. Here are ten essays by Hazlitt, Carlyle, Macaulay, Thackeray, Newman, Bagelot, Pater,. Stephen, Morley, and Thomas Arnold, and they arecritical essays...

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Human Metamorphosis – A Book Review

The trouble with economics is that, thinking we already know what it is, we often choose not to go there. Professional economists themselves are largely responsible; the highly abstract language with which their domain has been ring-fenced designates a protected area whose assumptions must be tacitly accepted before one is given entry. It is therefore a refreshing change to discover an economics that is built on its own logic, a logic which is able both to examine the erroneous thinking that lies at the root of the many and various anti-social outcomes of the prevailing economic order, and which can also find a practical foundation in thinking that starts with the human being. The appearance of global economy has confronted humanity...

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Demian – A book for the individual; sheep need not apply

My eyes widened.  I breathed sighs of relief and agreement.  My heart raced.  I wept. In short, this book rocked my world.  Upon first impression, Demian seems to be a chronicle of Emil Sinclair’s rocky, sometimes painful, transitions from childhood, through puberty, into adulthood.  I would venture to say that Sinclair actually, upon deeper reflection, has the opportunity to transition out of the “real world,” but only if he so chooses. At an early age, Sinclair is aware of an alluring dichotomy in life.  On the one hand, he is part of the world of purity and goodness.  He exists in this world with his parents and sisters, living a prayerful, righteous life.  In opposition to this fair world, a dark world...

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Awakening Beauty the Dr. Hauschka Way

Susan West Kurz’s new book, Awakening Beauty the Dr. Hauschka Way reflects her own transformation and discoveries about beauty from the many years of study and work with Dr. Hauschka Skin Care, Inc. In her book, Susan gently dismisses the standards of beauty the media has marched in front of us for the last 30 years.  She rejects the pursuit of beauty as a process of trying to make ourselves look like someone else or chasing certain images the media deems as the ultimate form of beauty. The book does not reject our desire to be beautiful; it recognizes the attraction to beauty, but finds a deeper meaning to the pull of beauty.  Susan finds the attraction of beauty lying in its origin, the...

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Book Review: Barack Obama’s “The Audacity of Hope”

Theodore Roosevelt once said, "The United States of America has not the option as to whether it will or it will not play a great part in the world. It must play a great part.  All that it can decide is whether it will play that part well or badly." If this is to be believed and I believe it is not only true of the US but virtually every capable nation in the world than this November 4th may mark a great turning point for not only the US but the world entire. Barack Obama's second book, The Audacity of Hope, is one part memoir, one part political infomercial.  The subtitle he uses is "Thoughts on Reclaiming the American Dream", and although the specifics...

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Speed as a Technique in the Novels of Balzac

The relation between Balzac’s fiction and that of the popular novelists of his generation has often provoked discussion. Various opin-ions have been advanced: at one extreme, the over-hasty and malignantjudgment of Sainte-Beuve, who persisted in classing Balzac with Sue and the feuilletonistes; at the other, the adulation of those who resent anycomparison between Balzac and men of second and third rank. Perhaps,in view of the importance which attaches to questions of technique, aresuscitation of the controversy is permissible: an investigation, this time, of Balzac’s treatment of violent physical action. The conclusion ofsuch a study might prove only that Balzac differed from the popularnovelists in which case, we should be bringing merely another coal to Newcastle. If, however, our investigation of violent...

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Dickens and the Evolution of Caricature

OUT of the pages of Pickwick step many of Dickens’s funniest eccentrics. Characters with mannerisms and tags of speech parade through the novel, illustrating a distinctive style of characterization which is usually labelled caricature in every novel he writes later. How and why did he begin this style? Much light can be thrown upon his early narrative development by a study of Mr. Jingle, the character which has one of the most extreme of all Dickens’s uses of eccentric mannerism—a rapid-fire, staccato habit of speech. Furthermore, an unbelievable anecdote usually constitutes the subject-matter of Mr. Jingle’s remarks, as; Don Bolaro Fizzgig—Grandee—only daughter—Donna Christina—splendid creature—loved me to distraction—jealous father—high-souled creature—hand- some Englishman—Donna Christina in despair—prussic acid—stomach pump in my portmanteau—operation performed—old...

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The three stages of Theodore Dreiser’s Naturalism

THE naturalism of Theodore Dreiser may be approached through a study of his personality, the sort of experiences he had in his forma- tive years, and the philosophical speculations which grew from his ex- periences and his reading. A warm, boundless human sympathy; a tremendous vital lust for life with a conviction that man is the end and measure of all things in a world which is nevertheless without purpose or standards; moral, ethical, and religious agnosticism; contact with the scientific thought of the late nineteenth century which emphasized the power and scope of mechanical laws over human desires; belief in a chemical-mechanistic explanation of the human machine—an explanation which substantiates his materialism while it does full justice to the mystery of...

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Poem Variation on the Word Sleep by Margret Atwood

This is a verse form about traveling into a dream. The talker wants to kip with a loved one and travel into their dream and protect them from the subconscious frights. The talker besides wants to convey the loved one dorsum from the dream safely and shelter that individual. The talker wants to be really of import in the other person’s life. The poem’s thought is clear in but the verse form has a batch of words that help readers understand her message. Some of the significances are actual. and some are topological. The different usage of words in this verse form assist the reader to see what the talker is experiencing. Actual significances are words that don’t have hidden significances....

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