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Ophelia “Frailty They Name Is Woman”

Hamlet says, "Frailty thy name is woman". Consider this statement in the light of the presentation of Aphelia; Identify key scenes and soliloquies for analysis Discuss various productions/interpretations State your preference of interpretation The word frail meaner when a person or object has the quality of being weak, fragile, weak in health or being morally unstable, also someone who is easily manipulated and influenced by people that surround them, unable to stand on their own. In this essay I plan to look into the character of Aphelia in the play Hamlet by William Shakespeare, to see whether she is a frail character and what factors contribute to this. I want to look at particular scenes where Aphelia is involved and ones...

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Michelangelo by Rhys Carpenter

I Stern and grim-visaged, gaunt, and dark of gaze, Time crouches in the outer-world of night Amid the shifting and entangled maze Of dusk and star-shine and half-lightless light, And with strong fingers moulds the unformed clay, Ruling the refluence of night and day With shape of sun and satellite. All men he fashions and all living things, All aspiration and all great desire, The might of conquerors, the strength of kings, The universal forces, good or dire, The star dust blown through windy heights of space, The glimmer from the utmost bounds of place, The thunderous comet flight of fire. One dream he holds forever in his eyes And vainly strives to fashion with his hands, A wonder world of storm unclouded skies And mystically Spring encompassed lands, A vision of all men become as Gods, Unbroken with...

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Gloria Anzaldúa’s Borderlands/La frontera: Cultural Studies, “Difference,” and the Non-Unitary Subject

In 1979, Audre Lorde denounced the pernicious practice of the “Special Third World Women’s Issue” (100). Ten years later, the title of one of the chapters in Trinh T. Minh-ha’s Woman, Native, Other—“Difference: A Special Third World Women’s Issue"—al- ludes to the lingering practice of acknowledging the subject of race and ethnicity but placing it on the margins conceptually through “special issues" of journals or “special panels" at conferences. In her “Feminism and Racism: A Report on the 1981 National Wom- en’s Studies Association Conference," Chela Sandoval critiqued the conference’s structure, which designated one consciousness- raising group for women of color yet offered proliferating choices for while women (60). Nine years later, a conference at UCLA on “Feminist Theory and...

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Hugo von Hofmannsthal’s Aesthetics: A Survey Based on the Prose Works

Hoffmannstal's Ad Me Ipsum which appeared posthumously in 1930, was an attempt on the part of the author to reduce his major work to a compact, often gnomic, schema of his creative intentions. Long before the appearance of this confession, which is a compendium of literary interpretation rather than aesthetic evaluation, it was obvious that the premature criticism of the nineties had wrongly classified the poet in the art-for-art’s-sake school. Not only were his early plays and lyrics highly colored by an exacting ethos (though its clear formulation came slowly and subsequently), but the various prose-pieces (Gesprache, Redett, Aufsatze, etc.) published at intervals from the early pseudo-authorship of Loris until the close of the poet’s life testify to an aes- thetic...

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Browning’s Friendship and Fame before Marriage

The current conception of Browning’s reputation before his marriage is based to a large extent on that little book of pleasant and readable scholarship by Professor T. R. Lounsbury, The Early Literary Career of Robert Browning. Lounsbury attempted to show that Pauline (1833) and Paracelsus (1835) were surprisingly well received for first poems; that Strafford (1837), a bad play, chilled this initial enthusiasm; and that Sordello (1840), a foolishly obscure poem, killed all enthusiasm except in a few. He went on to assert that the effect of Sordello lasted for many years, and that thereafter there was an ignorance “almost incredible” among “the great majority of the most highly educated class,” even among those “distinguished in letters,” and that this...

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Dryden’s epic manner and virgil

A heroic poem, truly such, is undoubtedly the greatest work which the soul of man is capable to perform.”1 While the solemnity of this pronouncement is certainly more characteristic of Rapin than of Dryden, the reverence for epic poetry is quite typical of the author of An Essay of Heroic Plays. As every reader of Dryden knows, the influence of Renaissance epic theory is all but omnipresent in his critical essays and prefaces. It is equally well known that the epic manner which Dryden often adopted in his verse owes much in a general way to the idea of the heroic poem. But fewer readers, I believe, realize the extent to which Dryden’s epic style is directly indebted to his “master,”...

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Arthur Miller’s Play The Crucible, and Edna St. Vincent’s poem Justice denied in Massachusetts

History had left many with unlawful strong beliefs. while no 1 can be certain of a person’s inexperienced persons. looking back it appears as if many tests were conducted ill. and that the strong beliefs of were based on undependable and incredible circumstantial grounds. Now. merely in hindsight. is it seen the mistakes made ab initio. and the failure of justness caused craze. Never is this more apparent so in Arthur Miller’s drama. The Crucible. and Edna St. Vincent verse form. Justice Denied in Massachusetts. While justness is meant to be administered with extreme equity and equality Arthur Miller’s play The Crucible demonstrates that this does non ever prevail. and in many fortunes the forces of unfairnesss are exposed. Those appointed...

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Analysis of Sylvia Plath’s poem “To Eva Descending Upon the Stair”

Sylvia Plaths’ verse form “To Eva Descending the Stair” may at foremost seem merely a petit larceny. pretty piece with a few good initial rhymes which plays upon the overused enigma of the universe. However. beyond the mentions to the Moon. Sun. and stars. Plath smartly hides deep symbols of heathen faith and the feminine Godhead. The rubric of the verse form is the first and lone reference of Eva. presumptively the addressed “you” in the remainder of the verse form. Eva could easy be a fluctuation of the Biblical Eve. Plath. herself a women's rightist during the early 1960’s. most likely chose Eva. or Eve. to stand for humanity. instead than stand foring it in the more common masculine signifier...

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Significant ideas explored in “Solstice Poem” by Margaret Atwood

Write about 250 words saying what important thought ( s ) are explored through this text. and how. Use quotation marks to back up your points. The verse form. “Solstice Poem. ” by Margaret Atwood is about a female parent sharing her ideas and inquiring herself how to raise her girl good so that she will be able to look after herself when she is older. The 3 chief thoughts recognized in this verse form are the artlessness of her daughter/children in general. the protection female parents feel the demand to give to their kids. and the importance of being true to oneself as we grow up. In the beginning of the verse form the female parent is depicting her girl at Christmas...

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Poem “The Unquiet Grave”

Drumhead The lover of a asleep adult female mourns for 1 twelvemonth and a twenty-four hours at his love’s grave. After this clip period. the adult male is given the chance to speak to the dead adult female. and he is taught an of import lesson. Terminology Folk Ballad is a vocal belonging to the common people music of a people or country. frequently bing in several versions or with regional fluctuations because it is passed down by word of oral cavity. non written. Rhythm is the form of beats. or emphasiss. in spoken or written linguistic communication. Lyric poesy is poesy in which authors express their ideas and feelings about a topic in a brief. but musical manner. Theme is a...

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